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Bright, geometrical shapes floating within embroidery grids; while – layer upon layer – hypnotising patterns evolve. Patterns which are always both: utmost abstraction and surprisingly concrete. After studying at the Academy of Fine Arts in Tilburg and some years of working within the fashion industry, Dutch visual artist Sigrid Calon turned her back on the daily life of custom sized work, deadlines and compromises in 2005. As an autonomous artist she finally found the time to entirely follow her curious mind, experimenting with materials and printing techniques while exploring the DNA of her own visual language. A milestone of this journey was her fateful encounter with the Risograph. Legend has it that from the very first moment, she couldn’t get her hands off this machine. Now, her colourful and electrifying Riso press artwork can be marvelled at in her latest Riso print publication SC_1/1_1/2_1/4_1/8.  More

Apartamento's Spring/Summer issue 2020 features Barbara Stauffacher Solomon, Andy Coolquitt, Simone Fattal & Etel Adnan, Thaddeus Mosley, Amèlia Riera, Nick Cave & Bob Faust, Gary Card, Gabrio Bini, [expand title="more"]Lena Platonos, Lucas Cantú & Carlos H Matos, Sam Chermayeff, Rirkrit Tiravanija, and Michael Snow. Plus: ‘No System’, a portfolio on ‘90s rave culture by Vinca Petersen; ‘A question of taste’, a conversation about food; Ray Johnson’s Pink House; and ‘Immediate family’, a photo album by Iris Humm.[/expand]

We are heading inside the archives in this issue of RUM – spatially as well as spiritually. In RUM’s universe, archives are an inescapable source of inspiration. We visit creatives who work with archive material or are in the process of producing it themselves. [expand title="more"]The archive at Georg Jensen, as one of the treasuries we pay a visit to, is according to its chief creative officer Nicholas Manville of the utmost importance for the company to truly understand its’ contribution to design over the past century. And at GUBI Creative director, Jacob Gubi Olsen explains what it’s like to work with the archives and heirs of some of the world’s late, great designers. Showcasing incredible homes is one of the most important cornerstones of RUM’s DNA and in this issue the Copenhagen-based Bülow-Askari family invite us inside their wholly unique house, which is the result of a very personal process. We also take a trip north to Stockholm, where the Swedish fashion house Acne Studios have made their new headquarters in a 1972 brutalist building. Creative director Jonny Johansson tells us about the work on the building, which alongside original features has centred on close collaborations with a number of international artists. In our big interview we talk to Mette Hay, who for the past 20 years has left her mark on Danish design history as one half of the global design success HAY.[/expand]

Joy Division emerged in the mid-70s at the start of a two-decades long Manchester scene that was to become much mythologised. It was then a city still labouring in the wake of the war and entering a phase of huge social and physical change, and something of this spirit made its way into the DNA of the band. [expand title="more"]Over the course of two albums, a handful of other seminal releases, and some legendary gigs, Joy Division became the most successful and exciting underground band of their generation. Then, on the brink of a tour to America, Ian Curtis took his own life. In This searing light, the sun and everything else, Jon Savage has assembled three decades worth of interviews with the principle players in the Joy Division story: Bernard Sumner, Peter Hook, Stephen Morris, Deborah Curtis, Peter Saville, Tony Wilson, Paul Morley, Alan Hempsall, Lesley Gilbert, Terry Mason, Anik Honoré, and many more. It is the story of how a band resurrected a city, how they came together in circumstances that are both accidental and extraordinary, and how their music galvanised a generation of fans, artists and musicians. It is a classic story of how young men armed with electric guitars and good taste in literature can change the world with four chords and three-and-a-half minutes of music. And it is the story of how illness and demons can rob the world of a shamanic lead singer and visionary lyricist. This searing light, the sun and everything else presents the history of Joy Division in an intimate and candid way, as orchestrated by the lodestar of British music writing, Jon Savage.[/expand]

An Exhibition Always Hides Another Exhibition is a collective portrait of Hans Ulrich Obrist composed by friends, collaborators, admirers, and inquisitors. [expand title="more"]From personal anecdotes to analytic estimations to visual representations, the contributions respond to the questions that frame the book: Who is HUO? What does HUO do? What has HUO done? Contributions by Etel Adnan, Bruce Altshuler, Ed Atkins, Daniel Birnbaum, Stefano Boeri, Sophie Collins, Douglas Coupland, Cui Jie, Manthia Diawara, Michael Diers, Andrew Durbin, Jimmie Durham, Monir Shahroudy Farmanfarmaian, Simone Fattal, Dominique Gonzalez-Foerster, Giorgio Griffa, Joseph Grigely, Boris Groys, Jacques Herzog, Ho Rui An, Jamian Juliano-Villani, Alex Katz, Koo Jeong A, Bruno Latour, Sophia Al-Maria, D. T. Max, Yoko Ono, Alan Pauls, Raqs Media Collective, Gerhard Richter, Torbjørn Rødland, Adrián Villar Rojas, Pascale Marthine Tayou, Adam Thirlwell, Agnès Varda, Wong Hoy Cheong.[/expand]

eighty degrees #2 takes us on a journey to Japan — a country that has been dutifully guarding and perfecting its tea culture for generations, while letting in fresh ideas of what tea could become.[expand title="more"]We will venture into matcha’s “hometown” Uji to sit down with an 11th-generation master and maker of this precious powder. We will explore wabi sabi — a philosophy that helps us stay grounded in an age where distractions keep us from self-discovery. We will witness the destruction of rooibos crops as the climate emergency wreaks havoc on the plains of South Africa. We will talk about tea in Brazil — a country whose DNA is steeped in coffee, but whose culture is constantly being redefined. We will step into the shoes of an orchestra conductor to deliver the perfect gong fu brew.[/expand]

All the glamour and cynicism of the dawning Jazz Age are on display in F. Scott Fitzgerald’s debut story collection. Flappers and Philosophers was first published in 1920, on the heels of the young author’s smash hit novel This Side of Paradise. [expand title="more"]The collection contains some of his most famous early stories, including “Bernice Bobs Her Hair,” “The Ice Palace,” “Head and Shoulders,” and “The Offshore Pirate.” In these pages we meet many of Fitzgerald’s trademark character types: the beautiful and headstrong young women and the dissolute young men of what came to be called the Lost Generation. With their bobbed hair and dangling cigarettes, his characters are sophisticated, witty, and, above all, modern: the spoiled heiress who falls for her kidnapper, the intellectual student whose life is turned upside-down by a chorus girl, the feuding debutantes whose weapons are cutting words and a pair of scissors.[/expand]

Issue #14: Family[expand title="more"]All happy families resemble one another, each unhappy family is unhappy in its own way. No family is perfect. This doesn’t have to be a bad thing. In issue #14 Fucking young! is all about family, the search for perfection that guides us when choosing new members for our families. It’s what allows us to love and become dependent on other people, other friends, other partners. This is the real family. It should be this sacred place of mutual understanding that protects and educates us. This family can consist of your mother, father, your friends, your cat, your boyfriend, your two boyfriends, grandmother, aunt: ultimately whoever you want it to consist of, without needing the proof provided by a DNA test. It’s to this family that we dedicate this issue. Whether traditional or unusual, this concept has been essential in the shaping of the designers, artists and other creatives that we’ve had the pleasure of speaking to.[/expand]

Beginning in 1948 with the introduction of its first sports car, the 356, Porsche has retained its automotive DNA, epitomized by the iconic 911, while also successfully extending their premium image through SUVs, SUV crossovers, and sedans with the Cayenne, Macan, and Panamera. With masterful control in all areas of branding including engineering, design, customer management, and storytelling, Porsche is still firmly pioneering the 21st century luxury car market.

We think we know services — not a day goes by without using them — until we have to design them. It is then that their realities confront us, teasing us sometimes. While services have always been ‘designed’, the qualities of their designs are more important than ever, given how much more we depend on them.[expand title="more"] Thus the need for deepening our understanding of what services are, what they can be, and why they fail — often in unexpected ways. Majid Iqbal reveals in Thinking in Services the surprising design of services — their internal structure or ‘DNA’ — through simple diagrams. It introduces a language and format for describing the concept of a service with clarity and depth. And, it provides the principles for implementing strategy through design.[/expand]