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To offer you a small glimpse of all the beautiful titles which are dropping in our little store day after day makes up the most enjoyable part of our job. And honestly, the easiest – since they all are exceptional in one way or another. But sometimes – as in the case of Susan Sontag – there resonates an undeniable reverence, an uncertainty about where to start or where to end. How can one possibly find the right words to come anywhere close to one of the most sharp-witted, charismatic and controversial writers of the twentieth century? The sincere answer is: We’ll not even try. The only thing we can do is highly suggest you to see the world through the eyes of an intellectual, a critic, a lover, a mother, a homosexual, a loner, a stubborn and above all, through the eyes of someone who fully dedicated her whole life to the written word. While you get hooked in Benjamin Moser’s latest biography or in the numerous essays of Sontag herself, one thing is for sure, they are after all these years still a delighting, eye-opening read, so much we can promise.  Buy

'In this long-awaited, brilliant biography, Benjamin Moser shows us how to read Susan Sontag - and, by extension, her times - in the present, and reveals the extends and limits of her genius. His psychologically nuanced critical study is written with sang-froid and compassion.' Chris Kraus [expand title="more"] Susan Sontag was our last great literary star. Her brilliant mind, political activism and striking image made her an emblem of the seductions - and the dangers - of the twentieth-century world. Her writing on art and politics, feminism and her homosexuality, celebrity and style, medicine and drugs, Fascism and Freudianism, Communism and Americanism, reflected the conflicted meanings of a most conflicted word: modernity. Drawing on hundreds of interviews, featuring nearly one hundred images, never seen before - Sontag is the first book based on the writer's restricted archives. It is an indelible portrait of one of the twentieth century's greatest thinkers, who lived one of the century's most romantic - and most anguished -lives.[/expand] read Review

The definitive biography of one of the most famous and influential artists the world has ever seen. [expand title="more"]When critics attacked Andy Warhol's Marilyn paintings as shallow, the Pop artist was happy to present himself as shallower still: He claimed that he silkscreened to avoid the hard work of painting, although he was actually a meticulous workaholic; in interviews he presented himself as a silly naïf when in private he was the canniest of sophisticates. Blake Gopnik's definitive biography digs deep into the contradictions and radical genius that led Andy Warhol to revolutionise our cultural world. Based on years of archival research and on interviews with hundreds of Warhol's surviving friends, lovers and enemies, Warhol traces the artist's path from his origins as the impoverished son of Eastern European immigrants in 1930s Pittsburgh, through his early success as a commercial illustrator and his groundbreaking pivot into fine art, to the society portraiture and popular celebrity of the '70s and '80s, as he reflected and responded to the changing dynamics of commerce and culture. Warhol sought out all the most glamorous figures of his times - Susan Sontag, Mick Jagger, the Barons de Rothschild - despite being burdened with an almost crippling shyness. Behind the public glitter of the artist's Factory, with its superstars, drag queens and socialites, there was a man who lived with his mother for much of his life and guarded the privacy of his home. He overcame the vicious homophobia of his youth to become a symbol of gay achievement, while always seeking the pleasures of traditional romance and coupledom. Filled with new insights into the artist's work and personality, Warhol asks: Was he a joke or a genius, a radical or a social climber? As Warhol himself would have answered: Yes. [/expand]

Andy Warhol, Susan Sontag, John Lennon & Yoko Ono — Jonas Mekas was well acquainted with a great many New York artists. Born in Lithuania, he came to Brooklyn via Germany in 1949 and began shooting his first experimental films there. Mekas developed a form of film diary in which he recorded his daily observations. [expand title="more"] He became the barometer of the New York art scene and a pioneer of American avant-garde cinema. Every week, starting in 1958 he published his legendary »Movie Journal« column in the Village Voice, writing on a range of subjects that were by no means restricted to the world of film. He conducted numerous interviews with artists, some of which will now appear for the first time in his Scrapbook of a Sixties. The book contains published and unpublished texts that reveal Mekas as a thoughtful diarist and an unparalleled chronicler of the day — a phenomenon that has continued now for over fifty years. [/expand]

Regarding the Pain of Others is Susan Sontag's searing analysis of our numbed response to images of horror. From Goya's Disasters of War to news footage and photographs of the conflicts in Vietnam, Rwanda and Bosnia, [expand title="more"]pictures have been charged with inspiring dissent, fostering violence or instilling apathy in us, the viewer. Regarding the Pain of Others will alter our thinking not only about the uses and meanings of images, but about the nature of war, the limits of sympathy, and the obligations of conscience.[/expand]

Susan Sontag's On Photography is a seminal and groundbreaking work on the subject.[expand title="more"]Susan Sontag's groundbreaking critique of photography asks forceful questions about the moral and aesthetic issues surrounding this art form. Photographs are everywhere, and the 'insatiability of the photographing eye' has profoundly altered our relationship with the world. Photographs have the power to shock, idealize or seduce, they create a sense of nostalgia and act as a memorial, and they can be used as evidence against us or to identify us. In these six incisive essays, Sontag examines the ways in which we use these omnipresent images to manufacture a sense of reality and authority in our lives.[/expand]

'Ethics' edited by Walead Beshty is part of the acclaimed 'Documents of Contemporary Art' series of anthologies. The boundary of a contemporary art object or project is no longer thought of solely in physical terms but rather in relation to the specific social field it creates. Art is thus increasingly implicated in questions of ethics. [expand title="more"]This collection evaluates the relation of ethics to aesthetics, an encounter central to the contested space of much recent practice. It brings together theoretical foundations for an ethics of aesthetics; appraisals of art that engages with ethical issues; statements and examples of methodologies adopted by a diverse range of artists; and examination of artworks that question the ethical conditions in which contemporary art is produced and experienced. Artists surveyed include Michael Asher, Tania Bruguera, Christoph Büchel, Merlin Carpenter, Paul Chan, Lygia Clark, Dexter Sinister, Fischli & Weiss, Andrea Fraser, Liam Gillick, David Hammons, Sharon Hayes, Thomas Hirschhorn, Khaled Hourani, Martin Kippenberger, Sharon Lockhart, Renzo Martens, Hélio Oiticica, Seth Price, Walid Raad, Martha Rosler, Tino Sehgal, Santiago Sierra, Wolfgang Tillmans and Rirkrit Tiravanija. Writers include Giorgio Agamben, Ariella Azoulay, Alain Badiou, Roland Barthes, Claire Bishop, Nicolas Bourriaud, Simon Critchley, Keller Easterling, Isabelle Graw, Jean-François Lyotard, Scorched Earth, Susan Sontag, Hito Steyerl, Triple Candie, Jan Verwoert and Eyal Weizman.[/expand] read Review

Although an elusive concept, "camp" can be found in most forms of artistic expression, revealing itself to be a complex aesthetic that challenges the status quo. [expand title="more"]As an expression of the playful dynamics between high art and popular culture, fashion both embraces and flaunts such camp modes as irony, humor, parody, pastiche, artifice, theatricality, and exaggeration. Drawing from Susan Sontag's seminal 1964 essay "Notes on 'Camp'," this multifaceted publication presents the sartorial manifestations of the camp sensibility while contributing new theoretical and conceptual insights to the camp canon through texts and images. Stunning new photography by Johnny Dufort highlights works by exceptional fashion designers including Thom Browne, John Galliano, Jean Paul Gaultier, Marc Jacobs, Karl Lagerfeld, Alessandro Michele, Franco Moschino, Yves Saint Laurent, Jeremy Scott, Anna Sui, Gianni Versace, and Vivienne Westwood.[/expand] read Review

A series of provocative discussions on everything from individual authors to contemporary religious thinking, Against Interpretation and Other Essays is the definitive collection of Susan Sontag's best known and important works published in Penguin Modern Classics. [expand title="more"]Against Interpretation was Susan Sontag's first collection of essays and made her name as one of the most incisive thinkers of our time. Sontag was among the first critics to write about the intersection between 'high' and 'low' art forms, and to give them equal value as valid topics, shown here in her epoch-making pieces 'Notes on Camp' and 'Against Interpretation'. Here too are impassioned discussions of Sartre, Camus, Simone Weil, Godard, Beckett, Lévi-Strauss, science-fiction movies, psychoanalysis and contemporary religious thought. Originally published in 1966, this collection has never gone out of print and has been a major influence on generations of readers, and the field of cultural criticism, ever since.[/expand]

Some are describing it as “You get the idea, or you don’t. And don’t even dream of asking why.” (Christopher Isherwood) Others don’t even bother trying to find the right words for it, but enact what camp might be. Both, theory and practice, are now gathered together in an opulent catalogue ‘Camp. Notes on Fashion’ published by Yale University Press. And yes, this book is indeed rose and turquoise. But honestly, how should it be otherwise – approaching fashionable notions of camp and supported by no one less than Gucci? Becoming popular at a moment of social, political and economic instability, to be camp was certainly the move of rebellion at the time. A time when popular culture was reaching out from its shadowy subculture spheres to the Olympus of Art – much to the horror of the establishment. More than half a century later The Metropolitan Museum of Art Costume Institute’s latest stroke of genius, the spring 2019 exhibition ‘Camp. Notes on Fashion’ curated by Andrew Bolton designed a lavish and not-less extravagant catalogue. Tracing the history of camp, its spectacular forms, the 250 objects dating from the seventeenth century to the present are not left on their own. As aesthetic grammar to decline the multifold notions of camp’s exuberant stylistics serves Susan Sontag’s probably most controversial seminal essay ‘Notes on Camp’ which she wrote shortly after leaving the sacred tin foil halls of Andy Warhol’s Factory on East 87th Street in 1964. This two-folded booklet will escort you into a world of haute couture’s most extravagant side, showing the exceptional work of fashion designers as Thom Browne, John Galliano, Jean Paul Gaultier, Marc Jacobs, Karl Lagerfeld, Alessandro Michele, Franco Moschino, Yves Saint Laurent, Jeremy Scott, Anna Sui, Gianni Versace, and Vivienne Westwood on the one side whereas on the other side you’ll find an extraordinary illuminating theoretical examination of camp in different times and different verve. Buy