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A fascinating exploration of Max Lamb's experimentation with materials, craft, and technology. One of the most exciting designers working today, Max Lamb (b. 1980) has received international acclaim for his innovative experiments with materials, craft, and technology. [expand title="more"]Drawn to the form of the chair and its relationship to the human body, Lamb has explored many different inventive outcomes in his ever-evolving Exercises in Seating project. This book investigates over a decade of creative practice with a focus on his interest in seating—from stone thrones to wood chairs and enameled-steel stools. In Lamb’s own words, “A seat is very simple in function, but very complex in the many different characters, forms, and ideas it can express.” Both retrospective and forward looking, this volume—created in collaboration with the artist—is the most thorough investigation of Lamb’s work to date and features an exclusive interview with noted artist Ryan Gander in which the designer discusses his creative processes and goals.[/expand]

Nuda is a theme based publication, investigating a field through visual culture and science. This issue is titled Beyond, focusing on the different perspectives of the spiritual, [expand title="more"]the supernatural, the subjective, the shadowy, the spectral, space. The aim is to map out different perspectives of the immaterial and try to grasp the disembodied experience. Featuring Marina Abramović, Hilma af Klint, Jemima Kirke, Roy Andersson, Jonny Johansson, Max Lamb, and many more.[/expand]

Find more of Max Lamb here. The oldest urushi object is about 9,000 years old and was found in Hokkaido, Japan. Fast forward to the 21st Century and you will find Max Lamb travelling, on numerous occasions since 2013, to Wajima in Ishikawa prefecture, [expand title="more"]Japan to work with the craft of urushi lacquer. Max Lamb is a designer with a mission: give him an existing tool, or an existing material, or indeed both, and he will single-handedly transform it into something you will find immediately familiar but which you have never seen before. This time (and time is the essence here), Max’s hyperactive no nonsense, no small talk attitude comes face to face with the incompressible time-making necessities of the urushi lacquer process. In this technique, the resinous sap from the lacquer tree ‘toxicodendron vernicifluum’ is slowly (extremely slowly by today’s production standards) coated layer by layer by layer, typically onto a wooden object, to create a stunningly crafted and highly durable product. Max is most comfortable being a swiss army knife of one. He makes everything himself, learning to use and brilliantly misuse tools and techniques. With URUSHI, however, he surrendered to an ancient method that is collaborative, in which a woodworker brings a wooden bowl, cabinet, table or stool to his neighbour who applies an urushi undercoat. They then take it to the other side of town to several craftspeople who in turn cover the previous artisans’ work in additional coats of lacquer. Each layer disappears below the next, until the last layer of urushi is finally perfected by one of the only two remaining polishers in Wajima who gives the inimitable shine of urushi by polishing the object with his printless fingertips. This slow human conveyor belt will last months as each layer of urushi dries the way nature intended, in actual time. For this body of work comprising tables, cabinets, shelves, stools, benches and chairs, Max Lamb learnt to work in a new way that relies on other people’s rituals and language, his modus operandi both uniting and colliding with the skills and minds of more than 23 craftspeople.[/expand]

Comes with different Covers. In issue #2 Ark Journal focuses on how architecture evolves and frames our existence and we celebrate the soulful interplay of art, design and architecture. In a special additional 16-page magazine the acclaimed photographer Francois Halard shares his personal portfolio of interiors and architecture. [expand title="more"]Danish Vietnamese artist Danh Vo invites us into his Berlin apartment and country home; Michèle Lamy explores materiality in her Paris atelier; John Pawson admits his new country home has softened his views on minimalism and Max Lamb discusses how materials dictate his designs. We visit a concrete house in Gotland that takes its cues from the rugged landscape; meet two Danish artists who built their home in Møn as a living composition; and discuss harmony and purpose with an architect and furniture designer in their Copenhagen apartment. Delving into the archives of the great Danish modernist Jørn Utzon, we visit two of his rarely shown houses that show his genius for designing homes that enrich their inhabitants’ lives.[/expand]

*Out of print Find more of Max Lamb here. Ode to chairs Dear chairs, You appear to be multiplying in our quiet brown house. Some of you are familiar old friends,[expand title="more"] others of you have only just arrived and I haven’t quite got used to you yet. Some of you I can’t move, some of you make me constantly stub my toe. Others of you are light as air as I move you from one corner of the room to another. Some of you are quite uncomfortable, others surprisingly relaxing; some quiet and humble, others a little louder. Some of you are ugly, but all of you are beautiful. Some of you I dislike, yet none I would want to live without. You come from nature, from the ground, trees and rocks, but you also speak of modern times. You are all different, but you are all made in the same spirit, by the same hands, and can stand alone or live together. Each of you speaks of a time, a place and a moment in our lives. With love, Gemma & Ivo[/expand]

Find more of Max Lamb here. Ode to chairs Dear chairs, You appear to be multiplying in our quiet brown house. Some of you are familiar old friends, others of you have only just arrived and I haven’t quite got used to you yet. Some of you I can’t move, some of you make me constantly stub my toe.[expand title="more"] Others of you are light as air as I move you from one corner of the room to another. Some of you are quite uncomfortable, others surprisingly relaxing; some quiet and humble, others a little louder. Some of you are ugly, but all of you are beautiful. Some of you I dislike, yet none I would want to live without. You come from nature, from the ground, trees and rocks, but you also speak of modern times. You are all different, but you are all made in the same spirit, by the same hands, and can stand alone or live together. Each of you speaks of a time, a place and a moment in our lives. With love, Gemma[/expand]

Find more of Max Lamb here. Monckton Walk Farm in the Yorkshire Wolds is run by my 89-year-old Grandfather, Dr Robert Andrew Dunning. He lives in a cottage that together we converted from an old cattle shed. Next to the cottage grew a female ash tree so large it overlooked the 150 acres of farmland and from where, on a clear day,[expand title="more"]York Minster could be seen 25 miles away. Alas, the age of the tree began to show and its largest limb had died and started to rot. For the safety of my Grandfather and the cottage it became necessary to fell the great ash. I wanted my Grandfather’s tree to survive beyond its rooted life, to offer the ash an afterlife and celebrate the nature of the material within. I wanted the tree to remain integral to the wood and to maintain the story told by its 187 annual growth rings — its age, the climatic conditions in which it grew, the years of heavy rainfall or drought, even its geographical orientation. Together with my friend Jon Turnbull, we cut the tree at regular intervals from the top down, respecting natural divisions within the structure such as knots, branches and crotches. I cut the ash into 131 logs of average ‘furniture’ height suitable for what my Grandfather would call ‘general purpose’ use. Whether as stool, table, chair or log, today My Grandfather’s Tree survives as an ash tree, but with a new function and the start of a new history. And where she once stood, a second generation of young ash trees are fast emerging from her roots.[/expand]

A special issue of A Magazine Curated By opens the doors to Floragatan 13 – the head office of Acne Studios in Stockholm. The ex-Czechoslovakian embassy evokes with its brutalist elements and concrete features the former Eastern Bloc, but once you enter ⁠stone carved furniture by Max Lamb already give you a hint that things are different here. Rooms in dusty pink, chairs in yellow leather, hangers full of samples, fabrics stuffed until the ceiling – the Acne Headquarters are designed to show the Acne-cool but also to bring to mind the experimental and ever changing structures of a fashion school. Because nothing kills innovation more than routine.⁠   Buy