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Over the past 18 months, stylist Ibrahim Kamara and photographer Rafael Pavarotti have emerged as a potent new force in fashion image-making. [expand title="more"]The duo are interviewed and present their latest work in a brand new 82-page fashion portfolio entitled ‘Your dreams are my dreams’, styled by Kamara and photographed by Pavarotti. Also in System’s 300+ page issue: Thebe Magugu in conversation with curator Hans Ulrich Obrist, in which the Johannesburg-based designer and 2019’s LVMH Prize winner reflects on how he uses fashion both to celebrate and interrogate the rich history of his homeland, South Africa. With photographs by Tim Elkaïm and styling by Agata Belcen. Photographer Mark Lebon transformed a garage in 1980s London into a creative playground known as Crunch and became the catalyst for a sprawling countercultural scene that continues to influence fashion today. System explores the people and legacy of Crunch, while presenting a new portfolio of work focused on a fashion story collaboration between Lebon and stylist Amanda Harlech. With contributions and recollections from the likes of John Galliano, Nick Knight, Kim Jones, Mario Sorrenti, Jean-Baptiste Mondino, Glen Luchford, Tyrone Lebon, and many more. Performance artist Vinson Fraley, Jr. and photographer Mario Sorrenti collaborate on a statement-making portfolio and conversation that leans beyond choreography and into abstraction, featuring the underwear of menswear designer Ludovic de Saint Sernin. Fashion historian Olivier Saillard meets Paris couture’s discreet radical Adeline André, with photographs by Maxime Imbert and styling by Camille Bidault-Waddington. Plus, Hung Huang on how post-lockdown shopping in China is keeping the industry afloat; Mahmoud ‘Mo’ Mfinanga on how today’s most important photographers are those who have been silenced; and Mohamed Megdoul on why gaming holds the future for fashion. And Bryanboy answers his bespoke ‘Shopping Questionnaire’ by Loïc Prigent. System Issue 16 is accompanied by an exclusive 70-page Coach supplement, exploring the American brand’s recent collaboration with Juergen Teller featuring the 16-strong ‘Coach family’ including Kaia Gerber and Hari Nef in New York, Kate Moss and Lexi Boling in London, and Xiao Wen Ju in Shanghai, to name a few. Accompanied by Juergen Teller and Coach’s creative director Stuart Vevers in conversation.[/expand]

Comes with different Covers. In 1993, Buffalo Zine’s Arts Editor-at-Large Hans Ulrich Obrist, sat down with artists Christian Boltanski and Bertrand Lazier at Café Select in Paris, where they began discussing an imaginary exhibition. Titled ‘Do It’, the exhibition would be built through sets of instructions given by contemporary artists, and freely available for anyone to interpret.[expand title="more"]A few years later, after this new exhibition model had travelled the globe and the list of contributors had expanded, it became a book, titled ‘Do It’: a public how-to guide for creating art that was part manual, part creative cookbook, and part do-it-yourself kit. Under the restrictions and limitations imposed by the circumstances of the past months, the spirit of the ‘Do It’ project has never felt more relevant. So for this issue of Buffalo, Hans Ulrich asked six artists to give us an instructions each that we have followed in the making of the magazine: 1. Avoid the straight line (Caroline Polachek) 2. Try the same idea in different ways (Shayne Oliver aka Leech) 3. Use only one typeface: Univers Black (Matthew M. Williams) 4. Do it through the lens of your best friend (FKA Twigs) 5. And as if nobody was going to buy the magazine (Miranda July) 6. Tell the truth. And a little lie. (Philippe Parreno)[/expand]

In his debut monograph Mitchell unifies his body of photography and film from his first US solo exhibition at the International Center of Photography (ICP) in New York. [expand title="more"]Each page of I Can Make You Feel Good is full bleed and bathed in Mitchell’s signature candy-colored palette. With no white space visible, the book’s design mirrors the photographer’s all-encompassing vision, which is characterized by a use of glowing natural light and rich color to portray the young Black men and women he photographs with intimacy and optimism. The monograph features written contributions from Hans Ulrich Obrist (Artistic Director, Serpentine Galleries), Deborah Willis (Chair of the Department of Photography & Imaging at the Tisch School of the Arts at New York University), Mirjam Kooiman (Curator, Foam), and Isolde Brielmaier (Curator-at-Large, ICP), whose critical voices examine the cultural prevalence of Mitchell’s reimagining of the Black experience.[/expand]

Comes with different Covers. Welcome to the Please Take A Seat issue, where we explore the radical act of sitting as a lens to investigate our fragmented new zeitgeist. In roughly 300 pages, we examine sitting through the polychromatic lens of sexuality, [expand title="more"]racial politics, spirituality, capital punishment, and the American justice system. What does it mean to sit? What does it mean to have a seat at the table? This issue includes a fascinating 35-page, in-depth exploration of the life and work of the inimitable Nan Goldin, and a portfolio of recent photographs, which include candid, personal images of her friend Thora, landscapes, the summer uprisings, and stills from her new film, Sirens. For the past five decades, Goldin has captured the turmoil of love, loss, trauma, dependency, and personal resurrection in her iconic images of friends and lovers with searing, visceral honesty. Her celebrated Ballad Of Sexual Dependency changed the way we experience contemporary photography forever. In an intimate interview, we discuss her life and work during lockdown, making the critics cry, and her advocacy group P.A.I.N., which was founded in response to the opioid epidemic in a quest to take down the Sackler Family for manufacturing and distributing the drug Oxycontin. The issue also features captivating conversations between Miranda July and Isabelle Albuquerque on companionship and July’s new film Kajillionaire, Kembra Pfahler and Hans Ulrich Obrist on the extremism of performance art, Sterling Ruby and Lucinda Devlin on capital punishment, Derek Fordjour and Torkwase Dyson on Black consciousness, Jermaine Francis and Beatriz Maués on sustainable fashion, Brad Phillips and Roe Ethridge on photography, and Gajin Fujita and Gabriella Sanchez on visibility in the diasporan panorama of Los Angeles.[/expand]

Comes with different Covers. Architect Mr. Stefano Boeri is the Editor-in-Chief of the main chapter dedicated to the Urban Forestry status titled The Grafted. [expand title="more"]Leading conversations with international stakeholders including – the Artistic Director of Hermès, Pierre-Alexis Dumas, the Commissioner of the New York City Department of Parks and Recreation Mitchell Silver, art curator and critic Hans Ulrich Obrist, botanist Patrick Blanc, London’s Deputy Mayor Shirley Rodrigues, and more.[/expand]

A Magazine by Highsnobiety returns with its gaze fixed on the future. Featuring Lil Nas X on what tomorrow holds, [expand title="more"]alongside chats with Juliana Huxtable, Naomi Osaka, Janaya Khan, Wim Hof, Jamaal Bowman and many others. Our hi-tech holiday gifting issue includes 51 pages of merch, robes, gadgets, technical gear and more. Plus four artist showcases, a takeover by Civilization NYC, a conversation between Marc Jacobs and Hans Ulrich Obrist, a brief history of the webcam and a sidereal trip through Club Future.[/expand]

Guess what?! We do have the 1st Volume of the book, too! An in-depth monograph of M/M, one of Europe’s most inventive and distinguished graphic-design studios. [expand title="more"]Originally established in 1992 by Michaxc3x83xc2xabl Amzalag and Mathias Augustyniak as a graphic design studio, M/M (Paris) have since defied categorization, becoming one of the most radical creative practices of today through their influential work across the contemporary cultural sphere. By collaborating with fashion designers and brands such as Alexander McQueen, Loewe, Louis Vuitton, Miuccia Prada, Jonathan Anderson, Nicolas Ghesquiere and Yohji Yamamoto; musicians Björk, Étienne Daho, Kanye West, Lou Doillon, Madonna, and Vanessa Paradis; contemporary artists including François Curlet, Philippe Parreno, Pierre Huyghe, and Sarah Morris; and rethinking the iconic titles Interview magazine, Purple Fashion, and Vogue Paris, M/M have been building a visual atlas of the creative landscape since the early 1990s. In this illustrated A to Z, beginning and ending with the letter M, interviews with Michaxc3x83xc2xabl Amzalag and Mathias Augustyniak frame over 850 images of their projects. A series of conversations with rarely-heard luminaries - designers Peter Saville, Experimental Jetset, Cornel Windlin and Katsumi Asaba; fashion designers Miuccia Prada and Jonathan Anderson; artist Francesco Vezzoli; cinematographer Darius Khondji; chef Jean-François Piege; theatre director Arthur Nauzyciel, and curator Hans Ulrich Obrist - are interspersed, providing a thought-provoking insight into the minds of one of the world’s most distinctive creative duos.[/expand]

Hat die Globalisierung ihr Versprechen, Kontinente und Menschen näherzubringen, eingelöst? Während des von der Bevölkerung verständnisvoll mitgetragenen Lockdowns wurde der Laptop-Screen zum verkleinerten Fenster zur Außenwelt, die befristete Demobilisierung zur allgemeinen Herausforderung. [expand title="more"]Von Widersprüchen umgeben, erleben wir neben zunehmenden Nationalismen ein rasant verbreitetes Streben nach dem Ende des Rassismus. Und die Kunstwelt? Obwohl diese sich erst spät globalisiert hat, nährt sie sich vom fließenden Übergang zwischen diversen Kulturen. Dies bedeutet sowohl Verlust als auch Gewinn: Denn der interkontinentale Austausch leidet nicht nur unter Ungleichgewicht und kolonialen Spätfolgen. Unter dem Stichwort „Homogenisierung“ droht der Kunstproduktion ebenso die Austrocknung des Meeres der Diversität. Welche Folgen hätte diese negative Utopie? Und wie verändern sich Rezeption und Praxis, wenn die fortlaufende Kunstgeschichte einen grundlegenden Wandel verzeichnet? Dieser KUNSTFORUM Band nähert sich dem Thema aus unterschiedlichen Perspektiven in Gesprächen mit jenen, die das Steuer der Globalisierung in der Hand haben sowie diese initiierten: Neben Jean-Hubert Martin natürlich u.a. Hans Ulrich Obrist, Peter Weibel, Simon Njami, Carolyn Christov-Bakargiev, David Elliott, Esther Schipper, Marc Spiegler, Uli Sigg. Erweitert wird der Band um Statements von Künstlern, Autoren, Kuratoren, Sammlern sowie Galeristen, die neben einer kritischen Analyse der aktuellen Situation neue Wege des Polykulturellen aufzeigen.[/expand]

What happens when musicians adopt ideas from the art world? And what paintings, sculptures and video works arise when visual artists allow them­selves to be influenced by music? [expand title="more"]This is the common thread of the exhibition »Black Album / White Cube – A Journey into Art and Music«, curated by Max Dax, the former editor-in-chief of Spex and Electronic Beats Magazine. The book features modern classics such as Peter Saville’s album cover design of Joy Division’s »Unknown Pleasures« (and a meditation on their derivatives), Emil Schult’s »Autobahn« painting for Kraftwerk, as well as Arthur Jafa’s apocalyptic video instal­lation APEX that rewrites pop history to the ­pulsating beat of a Detroit techno track by Robert Hood. The mutual influences between music and art become evident when Albert ­Oehlen is referencing Scooter and Rotterdam’s Euromasters in his paintings, and in photographs by Andrea Stappert, Anton Corbijn, Sven ­Marquardt, Luci Lux and Wolfgang Tillmans. Video works by Cyprien Gaillard, Mark Leckey and ­Daniel Blumberg extend this approach into the realm of film. The book features numerous background interviews that Max Dax has conducted with the participating artists – including Kim ­Gordon, Thomas Ruff and Michaela Melián. ­Further insight into the curator’s own practice is provided by an in-depth conversation with Hans Ulrich Obrist. Artists / Interviewees: Daniel Blumberg, Rutherford Chang, Phil Collins, Anton Corbijn, Kim ­Gordon, Scott King, Peter Knoch, Mark Leckey, Julian Lescoeur, Sven Marquardt, Michaela Melián, Radenko Milak, Albert Oehlen feat H.P. Baxxter, Thomas Ruff, Peter Saville, Thomas Scheibitz, Michael Schirner, Bettina Scholz, Emil Schult, Andrea Stappert, Henning Strassburger, Wolfgang Tillmans, Philip Topolovac, Ari Versluis / Ellie Uyttenbroek and Wolfgang Voigt[/expand]

In his debut monograph Mitchell unifies his body of photography and film from his first US solo exhibition at the International Center of Photography (ICP) in New York. Each page of I Can Make You Feel Good is full bleed and bathed in Mitchell's signature candy-colored palette. With no white space visible, the book's design mirrors the photographer's all-encompassing vision, which is characterized by a use of glowing natural light and rich color to portray the young Black men and women he photographs with intimacy and optimism. The monograph features written contributions from Hans Ulrich Obrist (Artistic Director, Serpentine Galleries), Deborah Willis (Chair of the Department of Photography & Imaging at the Tisch School of the Arts at New York University), Mirjam Kooiman (Curator, Foam), and Isolde Brielmaier (Curator-at-Large, ICP), whose critical voices examine the cultural prevalence of Mitchell's reimagining of the Black experience.