do you read me?!

Generic selectors
Exact matches only
Search in title
Search in content
Search in posts
Search in pages

About | Contact | Account

News & Novelties
Magazines, Books & Goods
Subscription & Services

Likes:
Items / Cart:

theory

No society in human history has demanded so many people to be such active participants in producing the contemporary. No contemporary has ever been so aggressively monetised. Everything is for sale. There is more merchandise than love, more sponsored content than truth. As a coping mechanism, many amongst us have decided to check out from reality altogether; preferring to inhabit tailor-made fantasies and simulations. But only children believe that closing their eyes renders them invisible to monsters. When the monsters are real, closing our eyes rather increases the danger.⁠ ⁠ The latest issue of Real Review asks "What To Believe" and delves into the realms of all sorts of belief systems like conspiracy theories, the stock market, and technology, as well as the ways we create a representative image of ourselves through styling, the perfect lawn, and wearing work clothes when we don't have to.⁠   Buy...

Once the cutting-edge technology of their time - video, floppy disk, CD and Super8 film are now virtually useless. Often, we even still have collections of these media somewhere in the basement, but we have no way to play them anymore - they have become obsolete.⁠ But there are some enthusiasts and artists who still appreciate these audio and visual carriers - mainly because of their specific aesthetics, which take you back to their era like a time capsule. And yes, there is often nostalgia involved, or a certain cultural pessimistic reflex that claims that "everything was better in the old days," but the love of obsolete media is also rebellious in nature. When recorders and cable outlets are scarce, it takes a certain amount of stubbornness to keep the technology alive.⁠ ⁠ ⁠H.o.Me. - Home for Obsolete Media introduces different analog media in a technological and culture historical context and demonstrates the potential inherent in working analog in the digital age.⁠ ⁠   Buy...

Since the rise of social media, the heart symbol is everywhere. We click it to communicate that we "like" something, we use it at the end of a comment in place of a thank you, and to spread love across language barriers, especially in these times of conflict and increased attention to social and racial injustice. Afterall the harmless little heart is the universal symbol of love! But there's the problem: who claims love? The seemingly innocent heart symbol hides a much more complex story than its surface suggests.⁠ ⁠ With "hate groups" renaming themselves "organizations of love," heart symbols on AfD posters and other Alt-Right groups in Europe, it is becoming clear that the "love" in the heart symbol can just as easily be seen as "hate" by the opposing political view. And at the same time, we automatically project our own values onto the heart symbol. "Can't be meant badly, after all, it's in the name of love."⁠ With corporations putting heart symbols on their websites and plastic bags, and paying billions for targeted advertising based on our clicks on little heart-shaped buttons, it seems that love is being marketed, mass-produced and sold. The heart has become a button to click, an emoji to send, and a digital currency.⁠ It claims trust and good intentions without defining them.⁠ ⁠ This clever little book takes a hard look at the symbol of love from its origins to its uses to its meaning, and uncovers all the things that are done in the name of ❤️.⁠   Buy...

From Google reviews to YouTube tutorials, and from online service desks to real-life ‘may I speak to the manager’ requests–we are all critics of our designed environments. It seems strange, argues publisher Onomatopee, that design criticism is a practice considered to be only for ‘experts’. Design belongs to all of us and, therefore, its criticism as well.⁠ ⁠ Through an open call they collected short texts that criticises, discusses, analyses or reflects upon an everyday design object, system, environment, or construct - written by non-design professionals. The chosen essays are displayed in this book, alongside commissioned contributions by renowned critics. With this book, Onomatopee wishes to break down the often closed circuit of design criticism and establish a grounding for a ‘design criticism for all’.⁠   Buy...

In the age of Trump and Brexit, every crisis is immediately replaced by the next one. The turbulent political weather of the twenty-first century creates anxiety and makes it difficult to look into an uncertain future. How should we react? Olivia Laing provides a brilliant, inspiring argument for why art is more important than ever as a force for resistance and repair. Art, she argues, is changing the way we see the world. It reveals inequalities, exposes, criticises and offers alternative paths.⁠ ⁠ Funny Weather brings together a career’s worth of Laing’s writing about art and culture, and their role in our political and emotional lives. She profiles Jean-Michel Basquiat and Georgia O’Keeffe, interviews Hilary Mantel and Ali Smith, writes love letters to David Bowie and Wolfgang Tillmans, and explores loneliness and technology, women and alcohol, sex and the body. With characteristic originality and compassion, Funny Weather celebrates art as an antidote to a frightening political time. The collection of short essays, articles, and columns that immerse you in an analysis, a stream of thought, or an emotional interpretation makes this book feel like spending an afternoon with one of your brainiest friends.⁠   Buy...

One of the most difficult questions in the art world. What makes a work of art valuable? From spreadability, meaning the frequency a piece circulates as image or text, to the creation of importance through affect and experience, to laziness being the only true art, to auctioning single words of a story - The Trouble with Value investigates how an artwork gains value in times when art is not necessarily rare or singular and the artist as master craftsman seems to be an outdated notion. Buy...

We know the universe had a beginning. But what happens at the end of the story? Our universe could collapse in upon itself, or rip itself apart, or even – in the next five minutes – succumb to an inescapable expanding bubble of doom. With lively wit and humor, astrophysicist Katie Mack takes us on a mind-bending tour through each of the cosmos’ possible finales: the Big Crunch, Heat Death, Vacuum Decay, the Big Rip and the Bounce.⁠ This captivating story of cosmic escapism examines a mesmerizing yet unfamiliar physics landscape while sharing the excitement a leading astrophysicist feels when thinking about the universe and our place in it. Amid stellar explosions and bouncing universes, Mack shows that even though we puny humans have no chance of changing how it all ends, we can at least begin to understand it. The End of Everything (astrophysically speaking) is a wildly fun, surprisingly upbeat ride to the farthest reaches of all that we know.⁠ Buy...

Since quite a while the fashion industry is facing a groundbreaking paradigm change. If there is a good thing about late capitalism, environmental pollution, shortage of resources, exploitative labour it would be that we, 'the happy consumer and devil producer', are forced to change our mindset radically – and with it our notion of luxury. Luxury nowadays is about time, quality and care. Caring for our planet, the next generations and ourselves. What a new generation of fashion designers has to contribute to change the rules of the fashion industry can be seen in the latest issue of Press & Fold. A fashion magazine which is deeply concerned about alternative fashion forms and narratives. In this issue the author of Dissolving the Ego of Fashion Daniëlle Bruggeman explains why it is so necessarily important to leave the Fashion's Ego behind, a self-maintaining desire machine producing nothing else than shallow promises, the JOIN Collective Clothes project gives a glimpse into their work to make and wear clothes together as well as you can find out how fashion and intellect goes together pretty well these days as magazines like 032c, Vestoj and Purple practicing this for years. Press & Fold is a carefully thought through paper delight, a fashionable beauty which hopefully will sustain for a long, long time. Buy...

To offer you a small glimpse of all the beautiful titles which are dropping in our little store day after day makes up the most enjoyable part of our job. And honestly, the easiest - since they all are exceptional in one way or another. But sometimes - as in the case of Susan Sontag - there resonates an undeniable reverence, an uncertainty about where to start or where to end. How can one possibly find the right words to come anywhere close to one of the most sharp-witted, charismatic and controversial writers of the twentieth century? The sincere answer is: We'll not even try. The only thing we can do is highly suggest you to see the world through the eyes of an intellectual, a critic, a lover, a mother, a homosexual, a loner, a stubborn and above all, through the eyes of someone who fully dedicated her whole life to the written word. While you get hooked in Benjamin Moser's latest biography or in the numerous essays of Sontag herself, one thing is for sure, they are after all these years still a delighting, eye-opening read, so much we can promise.  Buy...

During the Verbier Art Summit 'More than Real. Art in the digital Age', hold in 2018 on top of the Alps, key figures and leaders of the art scene came together to discuss one thing: What art can do and mean in the Digital Age. A first hint lies within the title itself: digital Art is not that alien to art practices before the rise of zeros and ones as one might expect. Digital art- same as its pre-digital ancestor intervene with reality in one way or another - and can lead to change and innovation. While Olafur Eliasson, Ed Atkins, Douglas Coupland among others pondered together about possible futures of art and its cultural value, there is one common undertone which is rather striking and characteristic of this Summit: 'To move in an increasingly digital world does not make us more robotic, but instead calls for us to become more human', as Daniel Birnbaum puts it. How digital art can be used as a medium to enhance our world is illustrated best in the 2nd interdisciplinary compilation of Verbier Art Summit whose contributors are, once again, willing to see the bigger picture as a chance rather than a threat. Got hooked? You can find the first publication to the inaugural Verbier Art Summit 'Size Matters! (De)Growth of the 21st Century Art Museum' here or even stream some of the talks from the top of 'The-Magic-Mountain'-alike scenery here.   Buy  ...