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sustainability

We warmly invite you to discover with us the first issue of Lissome. A reading soundtracked by live music will guide you into the conscious, calm, and gracious world of Lissome.⁠ So if you are interested in New Years resolutions which are not solely existing in order to break them but actually transform the way we live as well as re-imagine our role as humans in an endangered ecosystem we are happy to see you on Tuesday the 21.01.2020 at 6.30 pm in our store in Auguststraße 28, Berlin-Mitte⁠. If that doesn't sound like a good start for this year...

There are plenty of ways to design a better future. So many, actually, that it took the elves behind do you read me?! a few night shifts to finally present you a collection which will let your christmas tree shine sustainably this year. ⁠Spanning from The Touch by Kinfolk and their friends from Norm Architects, Jeroen Junte's 'Do it Ourselves' spotlighting the latest verve in Dutch Design, the impressive compendium Atlas of Furniture Design by Vitra, the unlimited paperback edition of the marvelous work of Herzog & de Meuron, Magdalene Odundo's 'Journey of Things' as well as Materialisation in Art & Design (MAD) which gives a glimpse behind the scenes of a temporary master at Sandberg Instituut.⁠ ⁠ Oh, and did we mention the fantastic book 'Architektur für die Katz'? It will definitely change the seven lives of your cat for the better - or at the least the current one. ⁠ For more last minutes Christmas Gifts click here. ...

"Saving the planet begins at breakfast" states the subtitle of "We are the Weather", the latest book of Jonathan Safran Foer. And while we chew on our Sunday brunch, we might initially take a defensive state - Really? Now Foer tells us that even our most favorite Sunday habit is a threat to life? - But stay calm, this book is not about food and eating habits. On the other hand it is also not meant to calm you. So we take that back.⁠ In the first part of the book, titled "The Unbelievable", Foer tells shortly historical turning points and personal stories, which all lead to the suspicion that the human mind is unable to emotionally engage with something that is terrifying by the facts but invisible in every day life and therefor not shaking our emotions. Like the climate crisis. "Our alarm systems are not built for conceptual threats." Which seems one of the reasons why we know about climate change and the threat it is to human life but are unable to take actions. And even though Foer just concluded that we are somehow immune to the devastating facts, he presents us with them nonetheless - through bullet-point lists. Arranged in small size bites and still far from being easily digestible.⁠ ⁠But instead of now presenting us with tools or action plans, what one might expect, to overcome our paralysis, we will read impressions and anecdotes of what means "Home" followed by a inner monologue titled "Dispute with the soul". And latest now it dawns us. What the hard facts are unable to do, Foer is trying (and succeeds at) - he emotionally shake us.⁠ ⁠ May that be the wake up call we all needed to finally take the steps necessary to safe our biotope, our home.⁠ Buy ...

We all know these moments when we just have enough of breaking news that show us in what destructive times we live in or how we will all end up in disaster. In these moments we like to distract ourselves with something light, something beautiful, that lifts our spirit and draws a smile upon our faces - something like flowers. Well, that won’t work this time! At least not with the latest issue of The Plant. ⁠ ⁠ „Our house is on fire.“ said Greta Thunberg and thousands of pupils followed her on the streets. They fight for our biotope, for nature and all living beings. The Plant accompanied these kids to learn more about their thoughts. But while the young generation sees their future taken away from them, the „nature artist“ Herman De Vries finds soothing reassurance in the thought that humanity fades and nature returns. Photographs of plastic wrapped flowers, grown, cut, and then sold to bring for a short moment nature and life into our concrete homes, the artificial gardens of Disneyland, they add to the conversation a picture of how deranged our relationship to nature undoubtedly is. This issue is not about plants, it is not about flowers, it is about us living with nature. It is about our planet, about mother earth and how we treat her.⁠ ⁠ Well, and for the ones really needing some recreation time, there is also a conversation with Olivia Laing full of plant talk and dirty hands solely from gardening.⁠ Buy ...

Designers always have used natural materials, thinking of wood, stones, clay. With mass production, however, mass exploitation and destruction became an indispensable part of the design world. ‘Nature: Collaborations in Design’, the catalogue of the sixth Cooper Hewitt Design Triennal, mirrors the profound awareness of designers, that it is time to change the paradigm. In seven chapters - Understand, Simulate, Salvage, Facilitate, Augment, Remediate, and Nurture - designers collaborate with specialists stirred by the desire for a more holistic approach and regenerative future. Together with biologists, engineers, agriculturists, and environmentalists the contributors rethink design processes and anticipate future challenges. They let algae cultivate pre-shaped materials, rain create pattern structures, or salt crystals grow whole stools. And by that undergo the ultimate collaboration - the one with nature itself. Buy...