do you read me?!

Generic selectors
Exact matches only
Search in title
Search in content
Search in posts
Search in pages

About | Contact | Account

News & Novelties
Magazines, Books & Goods
Subscription & Services

Likes:
Items / Cart:

plants

Already the ruling class of the Victorian era was well aware of the priceless potential of the narrow strip where the land ends and merges into the sea. To ensure the safety and guarantee the jaunty leisure time of the working class, architect Eugenius Birch was the first one to construct a screw-pile system in which iron supports were driven deep into the seabed. Although most of these piers are no longer in use the unwavering fascination for the waterfronts remains. Setting sail into the deep blue unknown and infinite horizons Pleasure Garden's latest issue is the perfect supplement for all the landlubbers out there who decided to go with Balconia for this year's summer holiday. Get ready for a cool breeze, the taste of salt in your mouth and a highly seductive lazy leisure time with captivating stories swirling around the seaside. Buy...

Where The Leaves Fall focus with their latest issue on extinction - from extraordinary picture essay on the floods in Bangladesh to efforts to save the world’s wild coffee species, many of which are at risk of extinction to how some plants, surviving the worst manmade disasters, can offer an alternative model for living in the face of the environmental crisis.⁠ Buy...

If you are in anyway like us, having difficulties to keep even a basil alive on the windowsill, then this book comes just in time to create a small potted garden for this summer. Expert planting advice for growing fruit and vegetables in containers, whether it be a window box or a terracotta pot on a balcony, are accompanied by 50 delicious recipes. Aaron Bertelsen from the renowned English garden Great Dixter guides you through cultivation methods, the pots to be used, gives personal tips on choosing varieties and advice on cultivation and care. This book proves that lack of space is no obstacle to growing what you want to eat. And what could be better than harvesting and cooking home-grown food. Buy...

The latest issue of The Plant accompanies Harley Weir on ceramics art therapy with her father, shows the democratic significance of a place like Central Park, travels with us to Rio de Janeiro, and talks with Hans Ulrich Obrist and Formafantasma about their - then soon to be opened -exhibition at Serpentine Galleries. Now Formafantasma's exhibition can only be seen online, the possibility to travel to Rio is just a vague memory, and Central Park has a makeshift hospital on its grounds. In short, it is an edition that comes from the world of yesterday. Which is less than two months away, and yet it seems like a lifetime. But that still does not make the issues irrelevant. Quite the opposite. With all the news and headlines revolving around Covid-19, the terrible scenes in hospitals, and the people trying to cope with quarantine, loneliness and unemployment, we should not forget that we are still in the middle of a climate crisis, that parks, nature and green spaces are important for our health, and that creative, meditative work with our hands, like pottery, has a good effect on our mental health. Let us look at the topics of yesterday, because more than ever they will be the topics of tomorrow.⁠ Buy...

When Swiss-Dutch landscape architect Anouk Vogel got invited to take part of the Architecture Monogram series she decided to do this – yet, not without her alter ego. Vogel is used to hear both sides of the story, when she starts to think about new projects – sometimes solely within her head, sometimes as soft whisper, while one adopts the analytical tasks, the other one stays intuitive. How this on-going dialogue ‘sounds’ like can be seen and ‘listened to’ in this thoughtfully composed artist book. Thereby her inner Q&A never stands alone. Architectural designs, photographs, and material collections accompany her thoughts and probably represents best, what both sides of her brain hemispheres certainly can agree on: “I wish design could be simply the possibility of something.” - “Rather than an end product?” - “Yes”. Buy...

When we think of flora, we often think of flowers. But it is trees that stand tall and majestic, that let us climb into their tops when we are children, that make us dream and listen to our stories. It is trees that provide us soothing shade in summer, paint our cities green and as woods are an endless inspiration for stories and folklore. "The Romance of the Trees" from Ernest Wilson from 1920 remembered John Tebbs, Editor in Chief, of his long hold strong connection with trees, which is deeply rooted in his childhood. The book inspired the fourth issue of Pleasure Garden, and so we find not just Ernest Wilson, but also Walt Whitman, the Redwood Trees, palmy leaves, woody fragrances, tree climbers and Mumbai treelife. Buy...

The beauty and high-quality production of the seventh issue of Rakesprogress is a hint that this magazine is suited for the shelves of a zealous collector. Obviously it’s about plants and gardening, but also about other topics like photography, fashion and pottery. These are presented by paying equal attention to style and quality content. The pages have an earthy-urban feel to them adding to the expression of the photographs, flat-spread on the pages perfectly befitting their sturdy uncoated quality. Buy...