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Photography

Drone Vision: Warfare, Surveillance, Protest brings the perfidious character of drones to the fore. Namely, seeing without being seen - and the associated insecurity and vulnerability, but also the usage for resistance and protest. The book presents three projects that move between art and politics - from migrant protests to colonial surveillance and the aesthetics of drone photography. The latter shows the geological scars and war remnants of five abandoned military sites in Israel - army strongholds, shooting ranges and urban warfare training facilities - and juxtaposes them with the personal and political scars engraved and marked on the private human body. Buy...

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As humble booksellers who watch the holiday season unfold from behind a cash register, we here at do you read me?! would be among the first to agree that the holidays have become less about celebrating religious or social events and more about the arrival of a certain rotund figure in a pretty far out red suit. Indeed, each passing December seems to reaffirm the free market’s unfettered socio-cultural ascent–which is good news for fans of money, stuff, and the pursuit of money to buy stuff; and bad news for fans of, say, the planet or human rights. After all, society can’t be too social if we are all collectively staring into the void of Black Friday sales on our non-fair trade iPhones. More

Mikiko Hara has her own way of secretly capturing the strangers who cross her path: a young man on the train, a couple holding hands, a little girl playing in a park… Sometimes their eyes meet briefly as she presses the shutter, but Mikiko Hara does not exchange with her subjects. Yet, these portraits reveal something infinitely personal.⁠ ⁠ Mikiko Hara’s approach, firmly rooted in a documentation of every- day life, extends in the intimacy of her living space: cut flowers in the sink, a strawberry shortcake in the fridge, her three sons dozing on the floor. The eye of the photographer, who is also a mother and wife, moves back and forth from the outside to the inside, from the public to the private sphere. Wherever she is, Mikiko Hara observes and tells stories like fragments of life.⁠ Buy...

Photographer Mao Ishikawa planned to photograph US soldiers on the island of Okinawa, but ultimately turned her camera to the girls who worked in the bars there.⁠ ⁠ In the 1970s, Mao Ishikawa began working in bars frequented by black US soldiers on the occupied Japanese island of Okinawa to pursue her photographic project. But the then 22-year-old photographer quickly became fascinated by the girls who worked behind the counters instead of the military men. The bar girls lived their lives to the fullest. Ishikawa candidly captures the hugs, laughter and smiles of young women in the prime of their lives, unafraid to show off, provoke, enjoy and freely express their feelings.⁠ ⁠ The photographs, which show the girls' love affairs, the bars, the afternoons on the beach and the children born of relationships with the soldiers, are a raw celebration of the freedom, strength and unashamed beauty of the women of Okinawa, far from sentimentalities and idealisations.⁠ Buy...

Davide Sorrenti, who was born into a family of photographers, began documenting his friends in their everyday lives as teenager. His style was raw, honest and very personal. By the age of 19, he was already New York's next talent for fashion photography and his photos were published in many magazines. Tragically, he died at the age of only 20.⁠ ⁠ In his much too short life, he produced an incredible number of photographs, as he was largely inspired by his friends and every day teenage life. This monograph is not only a testimony to his incredible eye and style, which was copied many times, but also gives us an insight into New York in the nineties, into teenage dreams, the freedom and at the same time the struggle of growing up.⁠ Buy...

We find that magazines are either obsessed with the new or nostalgic for the past, but Epoch brings the two into conversation and shows how culture is connected to and can be repositioned through history.⁠ ⁠ The 400-page first issue is set somewhere between fiction, research and fantasy and explores a myriad of topics including archaeology, visual arts, science, anthropology, fashion, technology, music, architecture, psychology and language.⁠ ⁠ We are in love with Epoch and its transhistorical approach!⁠ Buy...

The idea for Paradise Camp came to Yuki Kihara, an interdisciplinary artist of Japanese and Samoan descent, as she sat in front of three Gauguin paintings at the Met in New York. With a bit of luck, she was let into the museum before the official opening time, along with the security guards and cleaners. As she sat almost alone on an ottoman in front of these paintings in the museum, Kihara thought of Ngahuia Te Awekotuku's 1992 essay on Gauguin, in which Te Awekotuku asks whether Gauguin's famous paintings are "stories of mahu trickery" - mahu being the third gender in Tahiti.⁠⁠ ⁠⁠ Paul Gauguin's paintings of Tahitian women have often been criticised for their over-sexualised depictions. But Yuki Kihara, a fa'afafine - the third gender of Samoa - also saw a Western vision of exoticism and gender norms imposed on Pacific Islanders that was never her own. And so she decided to reclaim paradise.⁠⁠ Yuki Kihara is known for exploring the complexities of postcolonial history in the Pacific and challenging Western misinterpretations from the Fa'afafine perspective. Paradise Camp uses striking visual language to explore small island ecologies, queer rights, intersectionality and decolonisation, drawing attention to often untold, marginalised histories and issues facing Kihara's community.⁠⁠ ⁠⁠ ⁠⁠Paradise Camp is on show in the New Zealand Pavilion at this year's Venice Biennale.⁠⁠ Buy...

From the beginnings of colonial photography in the 19th century to contemporary images of 'white saviours' on social media, photography continues to play an essential role in the maintenance of white sovereignty. As various scholars have shown, the technology of the camera is not innocent either, nor are the images it produces.⁠ ⁠ Thus, the invention and perpetuation of the "white race" is not only a political, social and legal phenomenon, but also a complex visual one. In a time of revived fascism, we must seek to re-locate the image of whiteness in order to better understand its nonsensical construction. What does whiteness look like, and how might we begin to trace an anti-racist history of artistic resistance that works against this image?⁠ ⁠ The Image of Whiteness presents the visual history of whiteness - its falsehoods, its paradoxes and its part in manifesting power. It also presents works by photographic artists who subvert and critique this image. Buy...

Nicolas Floc'h's photographs seem to come from another world. Unearthly rock formations and scattered tiny star-like dots in infinite darkness. But these images are not from outer space. Rather, they have been taken from the surface of our planet Earth, and yet they are completely inaccessible to humans.⁠ ⁠ These alien-looking landscapes are from the bottom of the ocean, so deep that there is no light and no human can get there. To take the pictures, Nicolas Floc'h strapped his self-developed wide-angle camera system to the front of the Ariane robot and used the Ariane's headlights to illuminate the landscapes. Eleven dives between -700 and -1800 metres explore the ocean and our planet at the edge of the visible.⁠ Buy...

"My trip on the Trans-Siberian Railway was unique in that pretty much everything I experienced was different from what I had imagined," says Spanish photographer Coco Capitán. "I thought I would be traveling in a train filled with chatty and friendly passengers and I had the idea that my adventure would play out along these lines. I could already see in my mind the pictures of passengers caught by my camera inside the old train compartments. Nothing could have been further from the reality I encountered." ⁠⁠ ⁠⁠ Born in Seville in 1992 and now based in London, having moved there to study at Central Saint Martins and the Royal College of Art, Coco Capitán’s work spans a range of practices and media. Involved in the world of luxury from the start of her career, she rapidly gained international recognition as a fashion photographer. However, her artistic focus and accomplishments reach far beyond that sphere, combining photography, painting and performance with written slogans and aphorisms.⁠⁠ ⁠⁠ The Louis Vuitton Fashion Eye collection evokes cities, regions or countries through the eyes of fashion photographers, from emerging talents to industry legends. Each title in the series features an extensive selection of large-format photographs, together with biographical information and an interview with the photographer or a critical essay. After Louis Vuitton City Guides and Travel Books, this third collection presents travel photography with a fashion perspective, as the chosen photographers all infuse their images of great cities, faraway places or dream destinations with their unique vision.⁠⁠ Buy...