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Photography

The current issue of Foam Magazine focuses on the archive as a subject. Looking at contemporary forms of engagement with archival images and their reprocessing, a critical analysis of the histories told through photography is undertaken.⁠ The relationship between photography and the archive is symbiotic, but also an inherently problematic one. Foam places the construction of history and decolonial approaches at the center of its latest issue, revisiting photography's role in what we remember, what we forget, and how we tell the past.⁠   Buy...

60 years ago, world leaders agreed to leave Antarctica free of war, weapons and nuclear waste. They declared that the uninhabited continent with no indigenous population, twice the size of Australia and 98% ice, should not belong to any country and instead be dedicated to community science. Additional rules to prevent companies from mining minerals and drilling for oil made Antarctica the largest protected area in the world. Now climate change is eroding that success story. ⁠ But higher temperatures aren't the only threat to the pristine natural environment; in recent years, the continent has become a contested territory, concealing resources that could prove irresistible in a world with an ever-growing population.⁠ ⁠ On the 200th anniversary of the discovery of Antarctica, Antarctic Resolution offers a high-resolution image of this hyper-surveilled yet neglected continent. In contrast to the fragmented view offered by Big Data companies, the book is a holistic study of the continent’s unique geography, unparalleled scientific potential, contemporary geopolitical significance, experimental governance system, and extreme inhabitation model. A transnational network of multidisciplinary polar experts – represented in the form of authored texts, photographic essays, and data-based visual portfolios – reveals the intricate web of growing economic and strategic interests, tensions, and international rivalries, which are normally enveloped in darkness, as is the continent for six months of the year.   Buy...

In the period leading up to the 2020 elections in the United States, Teju Cole began to photograph his kitchen counter in Massachusetts. He photographed it every day over the course of five weeks. ⁠The photographed microcosm is in constant change. However, its compactness and manageability has a calming effect in a time in which nothing seems calming and manageable.⁠⠀ ⁠⠀ Alongside the photographs is a long written essay, as wide-ranging in its concerns—hunger, fasting, mourning, slavery, intimacy, painting, poetry and the history of photography—as the photographs are delimited in theirs. ⁠⠀ ⁠   Buy...

Originally commissioned as a photo essay for the New Yorker in 1995, New York Living Rooms offers a frank and intimate study of the interior living spaces of some of the city’s most fabled cultural figures, including Susan Sontag, Norman Mailer, Louise Bourgeois, Francesco Clemente, Allen Ginsberg, and Joan Didion. With nothing added and nothing altered, photographer Dominique Nabokov calls these images her interior ‘portraits’. Some spaces are indulgent and ostentatious, others shelter the bare necessities, but Nabokov simply records them all for her fellow voyeurs.⁠ Long out of print, this updated edition brings back to life an era of New York City history, seen through Nabokov’s original Polaroid photos.⁠ ⁠ ⁠ New York Living Rooms is the first instalment in Dominique Nabokov’s holy trinity of interior photography works, re-issued by Apartamento Publishing more than two decades after it was first published in 1998. ⁠ ⁠   Buy...

“I fell in love with your father because of his beautiful legs.” Sara Perovic often heard this sentence as a child. When she went through the family photos, she noticed that her father was mainly photographed playing tennis. After all, that's what he spent most of his time and thoughts on. His obsession with the sport hindered his attention to her as a child, she reflected. And now the story could repeat itself with her daughter's father, who also has beautiful tennis legs.⁠⠀ ⁠⠀ ‘My Father’s Legs’, a little book of photos of her father's and partner's legs in tennis positions, detached from the rest of the body, is not only weirdly beautiful, but also visualises the search for a deeper connection and understanding.⁠⠀ ⁠   Buy...

Eyes Open is a sourcebook full of photography ideas for children. Simple tasks encourage them to change angles, notice details, see the everyday in a new way, understand light and shadow, follow interests, create simple concepts and look, through the camera, at the world with different, sharper eyes. Compiled by none other than Magnum photographer Susan Meiselas.⁠⠀ Buy...

Last spring during the first lockdown, François Halard took one Polaroid every day for 56 days at his home in Arles. But this is not another Covid-lockdown publication. Under Halard's lens, every object, every piece of furniture, every painting becomes a silent souvenir of time.⁠ ⁠ Halard is rarely not traveling; so this enforced confinement was, he says, an opportunity "to look at the light coming into the house, to look at books in my library, to have another way of looking at time". The eclectic house, full of Proust's Madeleines, evokes a sense of a life lived. The hazy, dreamlike quality of these images will immerse you in memories and imaginations, giving them an intimate and poetic dimension. While the whole world stands still, Halard's house in Arles seems to breathe time.⁠ Buy...

This is a story about love beyond death. The photographer Seiichi Furuya met Christine Gössler, a student of art history, in Austria in 1978, and after just a few months they married. From day one, Furuya documented her and their bohemian life, travelling across Europe. After the birth of their son in 1981, she became increasingly involved in the world of theatre. As she was devoting herself to her acting lessons, she started to show signs of schizophrenia. Christine committed suicide in East Berlin in 1985. Even decades later she remains Furuya’s great subject. Revisiting his archives he created five books entitled Mémoires. But in 2018, when he again browsed through his archives, Furuya found something unexpected: in between were photographs of him taken by Christine. Often at about the same time that he had photographed her. The presentation of "Face to Face" is one of simple elegance. A photo of her on one side, a photo of him on the other. Sometimes the two pose in front of the same background, sometimes they are unclothed, sometimes they are in black and white, sometimes they are with other people. We see her, then we see him. Often the couple shows us two points of view on a single moment. But Christine's death looms over everything like a pending premonition. We search in her smiling face for clues. We see her change over the years. As a mother with her new born in her arms, she is extremely thin. Is she just tired, her body exhausted by the new tasks that parenthood brings with it or is she sick? Always in the same place but never in the same photograph, their insurmountable physical distance, separated through death, is palpable. Yet at the same time there is something comforting in the images. As if she were saying, "I see you, too." Buy...

Our hands carry an incredible symbolic power. They stand for creation, but also for conversation, hospitality, strength and protection. They invite and they defend, they show affection and they hurt, they pray and they shape. According to Aristotle, the hand is the "tool of tools". No wonder they are a recurring motif in art.⁠ Jeux de Mains brings together a hundred works of art centred on the hand - from Pablo Picasso to Helena Almeida, from Louise Bourgeois to Alberto Giacometti, from John Baldessari to Francesca Woodman, and a multitude of treasures from the ancient ages. It confronts and mixes famous, emerging and anonymous artists from a wide range of backgrounds, thus foregrounding the symbolic meaning and visual power of the hand.⁠ Buy...

The female body has not been owned by women for a long time. The way it is portrayed is dictated by advertising, the way it is viewed is dictated by the male gaze, what and how much of it should be seen is dictated by society and our nipples belong to Instagram and are locked behind little gif stickers. That's why this book is so refreshing. Body shows photographs of 46 women in their most natural form. Lotte van Raalte explores the female body with her camera without sexualising, without judging, without shaming, but with a loving eye for all shapes, ages and colours. The result is incredibly intimate and breathtaking. Time to reclaim our bodies and love them as they are! Buy...