do you read me?!

Generic selectors
Exact matches only
Search in title
Search in content
Search in posts
Search in pages

About | Contact | Account

News & Novelties
Magazines, Books & Goods
Subscription & Services

Likes:
Items / Cart:

migration

Do you know the work of Forensic Architecture? If not, then be prepared to get your mind blown! Connecting real cases of human rights and environmental violations with the tools used in architecture and design, this studio creates a Wolpertinger of art and real evidence which is then used in some of the biggest court cases and tribunals of recent years. ⁠ ⁠ From makeshift satellites constructed with a simple kite, a plastic bottle, some rubber band and a camera, documenting evidence of Bedouin inhabitation in the Negev desert where Bedouin ownership is contested; to reading the "fingerprints" of smoke clouds left behind by missile strikes; to training AI to identify teargas canisters in Hong Kong; to rebuilding whole rooms in 3D to verify the testimony of witnesses - Forensic Architecture is often challenged by voices declaring in an exhibition "This is evidence, not art!" or in a trial "This is art, not evidence!". Truth is, that exhibiting their work in art exhibitions draws international attention to cases that States or big corporations would only too gladly keep unnoticed. It helps victims be heard and get access to a public stage. It also sheds light on injustices, corruption and failures of our political systems. Which is the basis for change. But the fragments of truth are so meticulously and creatively collected, investigated and displayed that they all too often are also the missing proof in a trial. So what is it now? Art or Evidence? One of our all-time-favorite magazines mono.kultur set out to shed light on the manyfold works through an in depth interview with founder Eyal Weizman. And while you should absolutely read this heart stopping issue of mono.kultur we can already say that Forensic Architecture is the answer to the question what happens when art has real-world consequences.⁠   Buy...

In the Migrations issue of Safar, Mekdes Yilma and Tsigereda Brihanu discuss the realities, challenges, and dangers faced by migrant domestic workers in Lebanon and their work to end an oppressive system, while Miranda July shares three short stories from her collection "No One Belongs Here More than You", Elia Suleiman talks about identification with the globalised Palestine and his latest film "It Must be Heaven", Mazen Kerbaj illustrates his daily attempts to learn German, and Steven Heller discusses how to shift the design history discourse and his experiences with Impostor syndrome. ⁠A very inspiring issue!⁠ Buy...