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[vc_row][vc_column width='1/5'][/vc_column][vc_column width='3/5'] Here at do you read me?!, we are blessed with all sorts of interesting customers. Tourists from all over the world in search of unusual publications (and lots of tote bags); awkward couples on obvious first dates searching our shelves for books as well as a basic thread of conversation; the occasional gigantic dog roaming in with its owner and promptly sprawling over a sizable section of our little shop. But in the end, nothing tops the simple pleasure of seeing a customer derive visible, almost tactile joy, when they finally hold the latest issue of their favourite magazine in their hands. This month’s installment of our Surprise Subscription is a prime example of this particular phenomenon. We are excited to share with you… Real Review!  

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[vc_row][vc_column width='1/5'][/vc_column][vc_column width='3/5'] In light of the recent presidential election in France–whose results further reflect the deepening political polarization throughout Europe and the Western world as a whole–we thought that Rejected: Designs for the European Flag would be a timely choice for this month’s installment of our Surprise Subscription. More
[vc_row][vc_column width='1/5'][/vc_column][vc_column width='3/5'] For a long time, the terms fashion and sustainability seemed contradictory. If anything, sustainably produced garments were clothes - but never fashion. Fortunately, the world has changed since then and there is now a new generation that no longer separates style and responsibility. The Lissome is a brainchild of this generation. More

Climate change, political conflict, discrimination, displacement, and social justice - this new issue of Foam Talent addresses the pressing problems of our times and reminds us that photography has the capability to capture the unspeakable. ⁠⁠ ⁠⁠ 20 upcoming talents in photography look closely at both the world around us, and the one within — without shying away from discomfort or pain. Rather, they use the photographic medium to respond to, digest and navigate a world that continues to present new challenges and problematic structures.⁠⁠ Buy...

Founded in 2001, BUTT was as sassy as its name suggests. The quarterly magazine informed gay lifestyle trends, interviewed dozens of queer artists and published editorials that were both non-sexual and deliriously horny. BUTT’s aesthetic was hairy, authentic, intimate and shameless. Through fan-submitted photos, stories and articles, BUTT offered real insights into the contemporary gay lifestyle and built a strong community. Until it was discontinued in 2011.⁠ ⁠ And now it’s back after more than ten years!⁠ ⁠ The reborn BUTT picks up where it left off with issue 30, which features conversations with AA Bronson and male trans porn star Billy Vega, DJ Babynymph, art by Ajamu X and Sunil Gupta, poetry, diaries and a cover story by Clifford Prince King. Buy...

[vc_row][vc_column width='1/5'][/vc_column][vc_column width='3/5'] In this month’s instalment of our Surprise Subscription, we are super excited to present the new issue of one of our all-time favourites - the fantastic Record Culture Magazine! Karl Henkell, editor-in-chief of Record, thought of something special for us: a curated playlist to go along with this issue. Take a listen while you read our review!     Record, published twice a year, takes a deceptively simple format - long-form interviews accompanied by photos - and elevates it by the quality and integrity of its contributors. The magazine’s mission is to shine a light on the people intrinsic to niche music communities around the world, and it delivers every time.

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[vc_row][vc_column width='1/5'][/vc_column][vc_column width='3/5'] It’s a new year, and with it comes a new installment of our Surprise Subscription. This month, we bring you the very first issue of the new publication from the makers of Kajet Journal: introducing ‘The Future Of…’

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[vc_row][vc_column width='1/5'][/vc_column][vc_column width='3/5'] We all have an idea, when we travel there, of what a particular city is really like, or at least what it should be like: we picture Venice without all the tourists, Paris without the graffiti, London without the painfully-expensive ticket prices on the Tube. But those things are part of the truth of the place, aren’t they? And to deny them is to deny the reality of our lived experience of the world. Which is where Desired Landscapes comes in.

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[vc_row][vc_column width='1/5'][/vc_column][vc_column width='3/5'] Last month’s Surprise was a fluffy, fuzzy treat for the eyes. So for November, we thought we’d change it up a bit, with a challenge for the brain courtesy of DNA - Das Neue Alphabet/The New Alphabet!

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Do you know the work of Forensic Architecture? If not, then be prepared to get your mind blown! Connecting real cases of human rights and environmental violations with the tools used in architecture and design, this studio creates a Wolpertinger of art and real evidence which is then used in some of the biggest court cases and tribunals of recent years. ⁠ ⁠ Forensic Architecture is often challenged by voices declaring in an exhibition “This is evidence, not art!” or in a trial “This is art, not evidence!”. Truth is, that exhibiting their work in art exhibitions draws international attention to cases that States or big corporations would only too gladly keep unnoticed. It helps victims be heard and get access to a public stage. It also sheds light on injustices, corruption and failures of our political systems. ⁠ ⁠ This is the first installation of Forensic Architecture Reports, a series of books each dedicated to a single Forensic Architecture investigation:⁠ ⁠ On the evening of 4 August 2011, Mark Duggan was shot and killed by the police in the north London neighbourhood of Tottenham after the minicab in which he was traveling was pulled over by a team of undercover officers. The team had begun following Duggan shortly after receiving intelligence that he was in possession of a gun, and the officer who shot him testified that he had seen, for a ‘split second’, Duggan aiming the gun at him after he had exited the minicab. However, the gun was not found next to Duggan’s body on the pavement. According to the police, they discovered it in a patch of grass some seven meters away. The Duggan family’s legal team commissioned Forensic Architecture to conduct an investigation into the critical question at the heart of the case: How did the gun end up in the grass? With no video footage of the shooting itself, Forensic Architecture had to rely primarily on the written and oral testimony of the officers involved to develop a spatial investigation designed to test the plausibility of the police’s narrative and to examine whether the officers themselves could have planted the gun.⁠   Buy...