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At a time when mental health concerns are increasing and people are worried about their jobs, their lives and their loved ones, it may be easier to distract yourself with something light. But Dummy decided to talk about suicide. To be correct, the issue was actually already finished when the Corona pandemic hit Europe hard. So what now? Wrong time to talk about suicide? In Germany about ten thousand people end their lives every year - that's the population of a small German town. As difficult as this subject is, it is important to report on it. Especially in these times. Because we have to live with this topic.⁠ Buy...

It is the city of hustlers and suckers and jerks and pornstars and extras and cops. By now you probably know which city we are talking about. Right, L.A.! And yes, L.A.'s Americanness can be so annoying. From the perspective of a European, Los Angeles is the opposite of our old metropolises: the tangled network of highways and the constant driving around, the emphasised nonchalance and never ending optimism of everyone, the sunny weather, the ingenious modernist architecture, the film industry, the tourists, and the eating habits (no gluten, no milk, only raw, not after six...

New York is its own mythology. It is the metropolis to which the whole world turns in search of trends and movements. It is the city that once stole the idea of modern art from Paris and transformed it into a gigantic art bubble. But NY, like the American dream it embodies, is broken. For years it has been torn between nostalgia and capitalist excess, which does not seem to be detrimental to the creative breeding ground. And so this city, like the American dream, is full of false promises, but also ambitious, witty and resilient.⁠ No wonder Spike Art Magazine set out to investigate this multi-layered biotope of creation and destruction. They take us through the ever-changing, ever-exciting art scene, from artist studios to thoughts like why New York is such a bore and why doesn't anyone have sex in New York anymore. For this issue, they even changed the entire layout of their magazine to make it look like New York's famous subway system. If you're wondering now if all the articles are from the time before Corona - they aren't. This virus also finds its place in this issue, but not only. Although New York is so badly hit by Covid-19 that even she who never sleeps stands still for a moment. But that won't make the problems that this city had before disappear, on the contrary, and neither will the creative scene disappear, since it always came from the bottom. And so the myth of New York tells us that this city will rise again because New Yorkers are stubborn and strong and resolute. And because they are the ones who make New York what it is.⁠ May this myth not be an illusion. New York! New York!⁠ Buy ⁠...

This is a copy, an homage, and a stroke of genius at the same time. Eckhard and Max Siedentopf, father and son and great fans of Toiletpaper magazine, delight us with the reenactment of the iconic photographs of Maurizio Cattelan and Pierpaolo Ferrari. The result is extremely funny, as fantastic as their famous inspiration and incredibly well executed. The photographs even have a lightness and spontaneity that the deliberately staged images of Toiletpaper Magazine never had. Our only criticism is that we did not think of it first.⁠ Buy ⁠...

Cities are growing and changing faster than ever before, often leaving their citizens frustrated, and people are beginning to worry about saving buildings, empty spaces or even signage. Falsely articulated as a call for nostalgia, the discontent stems in fact from a leap of narrative growing unable to connect yesterday to tomorrow to affirm a sense of belonging. For Desired Landscapes preservation of the urban fabric is intended to leave behind clues of a lived past, as a sign of honesty. This wonderful little magazine is doing its part by preserving a moment in time of a place through storytelling.⁠ Buy...

The latest issue of The Plant accompanies Harley Weir on ceramics art therapy with her father, shows the democratic significance of a place like Central Park, travels with us to Rio de Janeiro, and talks with Hans Ulrich Obrist and Formafantasma about their - then soon to be opened -exhibition at Serpentine Galleries. Now Formafantasma's exhibition can only be seen online, the possibility to travel to Rio is just a vague memory, and Central Park has a makeshift hospital on its grounds. In short, it is an edition that comes from the world of yesterday. Which is less than two months away, and yet it seems like a lifetime. But that still does not make the issues irrelevant. Quite the opposite. With all the news and headlines revolving around Covid-19, the terrible scenes in hospitals, and the people trying to cope with quarantine, loneliness and unemployment, we should not forget that we are still in the middle of a climate crisis, that parks, nature and green spaces are important for our health, and that creative, meditative work with our hands, like pottery, has a good effect on our mental health. Let us look at the topics of yesterday, because more than ever they will be the topics of tomorrow.⁠ Buy...

Simple physics dictates that when you stir your tea in a cup, centrifugal forces should make any tea leaf residue move outwards towards the wall of the tea cup. Why is it then, that the opposite happens and they gather in the center? Don't worry if you do not know the answer. Nobel Prize laureate Erwin Schrödinger (the one with the cat) could not find an explanation either. He brought the question to Albert Einstein, who came up with a theory, which he used to then also explain why riverbeds have a meandering shape. Which shows that a simple cup of tea makes even the brightest of us a bit smarter.⁠ And so does Journal du Thé issue 3, with wonderful little anecdotes like this, an Indian tea diary, the most beautiful tea cups and pots from ceramic and copper, tii-time in Zimbabwe, and stories about Wagashi - the most delightful Japanese sugary treats. Buy...

One reason to get hold of the latest issue of Zeit Magazin International: Tyler Mitchell is (one might tend to say only!!!) 25 years old and – almost did it all! A solo-exhibition at Foam Fotografiemuseum Amsterdam, a cascade of magazine covers as Office, i-D, Dazed, AnOther – just to name a few – followed by fashion campaigns for Comme des Garçons, Prada, Givenchy (etc. pp.), and on top if it, Vogue’s famously Cover for the September issue together with Beyonce. Of course, we don’t know what is more shocking: That he was the first African American photographer in Vogue’s 125 history to do so or again, his age. Either way, we are already in love with this guy, who mentions James Baldwin and Frank Ocean within seconds, gives talks at universities while his photographic work traverse a new aesthetic of blackness. Other reasons are: interviews with William Defoe, Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, a homage to artist Tomi Ungerer...

Every day feels like groundhog day? Well, let’s make it a Friday then! In line with this, we like to recommend you the latest issue of Noble Rot, which name, ‘The Difficult Second Album’, speaks volumes for these nerve-racking times. With an extended interview between Dan Keeling (one of the two wine and food enthusiasts behind this fantastic magazine) and hard-partying bad boy of the 80’s, American novelist and wine writer Jan McInerney aka the ‘hedonist in the cellar’, a flashback of how Henry Harris remembers meeting and falling instantly under the spell of chef and food critic Simon Hopkinson, as well as a detour through Catalonia’s most interesting new wines, Noble Rot provides the exact amount of liquid self care we need right now. Buy...

With the globalisation we created the burden of a world wide indistinguishable visual language. Everything seems to look the same. The rise of social media platforms did the rest. We seem to sink in an ocean of sameness, of boring mediocracy that wants to speak to the masses. So Modern Matter set out to look for the artists that, instead of confirming and resampling the known, enrich us through their own vision and worlds - unfiltered and bold.⁠ Buy...