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[gallery ids="72472,72474,72475"] ⁠If you, like us, are thinking now might be a good time to grab something new to add to your reading list…we just got our hands on Rachel Cusk’s incredible ‘Outline’ trilogy: ⁠A woman is on an aeroplane. A woman is sitting in a classroom. A woman is at a dinner party. Who is she? We are afforded only the briefest glimpses of Faye, the person who would ordinarily take the role of “main character” in this sparely-written trilogy of novels. This is what Rachel Cusk wants– to do away with character. And she succeeds. ‘Outline’, ‘Transit’ and ‘Kudos’ form a cycle where in place of a “plot”, acquaintances, colleagues, friends and strangers appear like phantoms to use Faye as a sort of sounding-board, their identities and experiences narrated purely and cleanly as though distilled, before receding again. These episodes build up on each other over the course of the three novels to reach a powerful and devastating conclusion as exciting as any thriller. As they do so, the spaces in between the conversations paint a portrait of Faye as a woman coming to terms with a great loss, and with herself, and the unfamiliar territory she finds herself in. And as you read these novels, you realise you, too, are on foreign ground – this is a whole new kind of fiction, one that can only be experienced by picking up a copy and letting it in.⁠ Find all books of Rachel Cusk here...

The easiest way to get right to the bottom of things is - naturally - playing ‚Truth and Dare‘. So let’s start with bare facts. You think poetry is rather dusty, quixotic or charming as moulded grey bread? No worries, you don’t have to say your answer out loud. Frankly, we (almost) all have been there. But we have to break it to you: The natural evolution of the lyrical section on our shelves almost clandestinely multiplied itself over the last few years. And this is not the only thing to say about this art form currently experiencing a fulminant renaissance. The revival of poems comes along fresh, colorful, innovative and - definitely worth to mention - the fellows who are falling for lyrical rhythms, getting lost in-between the lines are as vivid and young as their thrilled audience. And still, as Poetry Magazine (launched in 1912!) names the elephant in the room already within its title: Who reads poetry? We thought it would be a smart move to choose ‚Dare‘ and asked one of the most dazzling voices of this new poetry wave and the co-editor of Pain Magazine: Vala Thorodds.

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First introduced in the early 1960s, the Penguin Modern Poets was relaunched last summer with a new series aiming for the same goal: ‘to introduce contemporary poetry to the general reader.’ Each of the series’s volumes exhibits the work of three remarkable poets who are currently writing. The series follows a shared rationale where the poets’ work in every issue is interconnected. So for example the first volume by Emily Berry, Anne Carson and Sophie Collins is about female experience in the present, and all the way back to ancient Greece. Whereas in the second issue it is the humorous style which distinguishes the writing of the three poets...