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Drone Vision: Warfare, Surveillance, Protest brings the perfidious character of drones to the fore. Namely, seeing without being seen - and the associated insecurity and vulnerability, but also the usage for resistance and protest. The book presents three projects that move between art and politics - from migrant protests to colonial surveillance and the aesthetics of drone photography. The latter shows the geological scars and war remnants of five abandoned military sites in Israel - army strongholds, shooting ranges and urban warfare training facilities - and juxtaposes them with the personal and political scars engraved and marked on the private human body. Buy...

"In your text, treat Africa as if it were one country. It is hot and dusty with rolling grasslands and huge herds of animals and tall, thin people who are starving. Or it is hot and steamy with very short people who eat primates. Don't get bogged down with precise descriptions."⁠ ⁠ This is a trailblazing collection of writings by rule-breaker Binyavanga Wainaina. Full of sharp satire and piercing wisdom, it contains many of Binyavanga's critically acclaimed works, including the satirical sensation How to Write About Africa, quoted above, which plays with the way Western media have reinforced stereotypes and pre-existing notions about Africa. Buy...

On the surface of a red-figure Attica vase, some thousands years ago, an inscription reading “ο Παῖς Καλός” had been engraved. Translating as The Boy Is Beautiful this intricate detail transforms a common vessel into a declaration of homoerotic affection; echoing the sexual liberation of a bygone era.⁠ ⁠ The Boy Is Beautiful took this as an inspiration to investigate into queer Greek chronicles, from myth and history, to contemporary life. A quest with the question what happened between the time of Zeus and Ganymede, Apollo and Hyacinth, Achilles and Patroclus, the Band of Thebes and the Lesbian Sappho, Harmodius and Aristogeiton and the contemporary society full of sexism, homophobie and straightwashed history.⁠ Buy...

Photographer Mao Ishikawa planned to photograph US soldiers on the island of Okinawa, but ultimately turned her camera to the girls who worked in the bars there.⁠ ⁠ In the 1970s, Mao Ishikawa began working in bars frequented by black US soldiers on the occupied Japanese island of Okinawa to pursue her photographic project. But the then 22-year-old photographer quickly became fascinated by the girls who worked behind the counters instead of the military men. The bar girls lived their lives to the fullest. Ishikawa candidly captures the hugs, laughter and smiles of young women in the prime of their lives, unafraid to show off, provoke, enjoy and freely express their feelings.⁠ ⁠ The photographs, which show the girls' love affairs, the bars, the afternoons on the beach and the children born of relationships with the soldiers, are a raw celebration of the freedom, strength and unashamed beauty of the women of Okinawa, far from sentimentalities and idealisations.⁠ Buy...

The world today faces overwhelming environmental and social problems. To combat, change and overcome these challenges, collective action is necessary and inevitable. This has led to new forms of collective art and design practices: Artists collaborate with non-artists, make products for their local environment and take on multiple identities such as researcher, community activist, computer hacker or business consultant.⁠ ⁠ The book "Making Matters" by the fantastic publisher Onomatopee looks at art practices on all continents where the boundaries between art, design, research and activism are blurring or dissolving. ⁠ Buy...

We find that magazines are either obsessed with the new or nostalgic for the past, but Epoch brings the two into conversation and shows how culture is connected to and can be repositioned through history.⁠ ⁠ The 400-page first issue is set somewhere between fiction, research and fantasy and explores a myriad of topics including archaeology, visual arts, science, anthropology, fashion, technology, music, architecture, psychology and language.⁠ ⁠ We are in love with Epoch and its transhistorical approach!⁠ Buy...

Utopia Ending is an impressive new addition to our architecture shelf.⁠ ⁠ The utopia in this case is the city of London while the ending was created by the change in the housing market over the years - from the post-World War II expansion based on social housing to today's finance-driven development of the city. The investigation through photographs and essays makes it clear: investment in social housing has been almost completely scrapped and the new buildings are financial assets for global investors rather than housing for Londoners. Buy...

Out of the Sun sheds light on the people and stories that have remained in the shadows - more specifically, the stories of Black people that history has not recorded.⁠ ⁠ Edugyan tackles in this book race and representation, memory and belonging, and sensitively explores what it means to be seen and who remains unseen. For change to happen, we must first acknowledge "the vastly unequal places from which we each speak, the ways some have been denied voices when others are so easily heard”, she writes.⁠ Buy...

Matter is a constant. It has been there from the beginning and it will remain in the future. ⁠ Derived from the Latin word mater, meaning mother, it refers to the substance of which all things are made. In English, the word can also refer to urgency or importance, something to be taken care of. Aleix Plademunt's photographic project Matter explores matter, which although itself inert, immobile and unable to reproduce, is the basis of all life. This book is about our origins, existence and the Big Bang. And about the organism at the end of which is death - but matter remains.⁠ Buy...

Acid House As It Happened - a brilliant title for what is already the definitive unofficial visual history of 1988. Dave Swindells photographed Acid nights in ‘88 in different clubs but also in car parks and bus depots. Dave documented and wrote about it all back then as the nightlife editor of Time Out, and is now re-visiting and re-telling the history of Acid House. As it happened. In his own words. And of course his own photographs. ⁠ Buy...