do you read me?!

Generic selectors
Exact matches only
Search in title
Search in content
Search in posts
Search in pages

About | Contact | Account

News & Novelties
Magazines, Books & Goods
Subscription & Services

Likes:
Items / Cart:

history

"Das letzte Jahr", German for "the last year" does not refer to our last year 2020, which is fortunate because we already have had enough of that. The year meant is 1990, a rather important year in Germany because it was the year in which the reunification of West and East Germany was hastily accomplished. And yet it fell into a collective oblivion. Everyone remembers 1989, when we danced on the Wall. But 1990 seems too scattered to grasp. ⁠ ⁠ The author Martin Gross tried at the time. He had an intuition of the significance of the year that marked the downfall and reshaping of the country. Living in the GDR for a year, he described how people made the transition from the old to the new system. He portrayed people as diverse as the guard of a former Stasi prison, the store manager of one of the new supermarkets, the stokers of a power station, the bodyguards of a minister and the cleaners of a government building.⁠ ⁠ The book was first published in 1992, but was soon forgotten. In 2019, Jan Wenzel came across it while researching for his book "1990 Freilegen" and took many of its notes. With a distance of 30 years, these notes were now perceived by critics as "clear-sighted", "precise", "stylistically brilliant" observations of the turning year. But the author himself could not be found. Fortunately, contact was finally made in June 2020 and a new edition of the title was planned.⁠ ⁠ And so here it is again, a book that describes a historical event, not through political steps, but through the impact it had on people's daily lives. Buy...

Humans and horses share an inseparable history. First as a means of transport and labour, they became popular pets with moral status, used for recreation, competition and medical therapy. A less documented part of this history is the horse serving as food. Heleen Peeters explores horse culture around the world, navigating from breeders, competitions and rescue centres to slaughterhouses, factories and butchers. In a visually stunning way, she touches on questions about our relationship with animals and meat consumption.⁠ Buy...

Wild, rocky cliffs along deserted coasts, empty streets between abandoned houses captured in the break of dawn...

So Harry says, "You don't like me anymore. Why not?" And he says, "Because you've got so terribly pretentious." And Harry says, "Pretentious, moi?" - Fawlty Towers⁠ ⁠ What is pretentiousness? Why do we despise it? And more controversially: why is it vital to a thriving culture? In this brilliant, passionate essay, Dan Fox argues that it has always been an essential mechanism of the arts, from the most wildly successful pop music and fashion through to the most recondite avenues of literature and the visual arts. Pretentiousness: Why it Matters unpacks the uses and abuses of the term, tracing its connections to theatre, politics and class. From method acting to vogueing balls in Harlem, from Brian Eno to normcore, Fox draws on a wide range of references in advocating critical imagination and open-mindedness over knee-jerk accusations of elitism or simple fear of the new and the different. Drawing on his own experiences growing up and working at the more radical edges of the arts, this book is a timely defence of pretentiousness as a necessity for innovation and diversity in our culture.⁠ ⁠...

In the spring of 1945, at the close of the Second World War, refugees from the Nazi concentration camps arrived with “White Buses” operated by the Swedish Red Cross in Malmö. With public facilities quickly reaching capacity, Malmö Konstmuseum's director Ernst Fischer decided overnight to transform the museum into a refugee shelter, providing hundreds of beds. The event is memorialised in a monumental painting from the same year by the artist Sven Xet Erixson. But it is also recorded in the many drawings left behind by those who found accommodation in the museum, which have remained in the collection ever since. Among them are small works on paper that depict life in the concentration camps, or portraits of other prisoners.⁠ The own history and the recent events let to the exhibition "Migration: Traces in an Art Collection". How have artists related to exile and migration over the past 150 years? From the artworks left behind by the concentration camp survivors to works of exiled Latvian artist in Sweden to works by artists who have firsthand experience of migration but do not explicitly depict it in their art, the publication accompanying the exhibition engages a range of artistic expressions of the migrant experience. It also presents a number of contemporary works that comment on the perception of migration and displacement in a globalised world while examining the museum itself as a site of knowledge production.⁠ Buy...

Since the introduction of portable consumer electronics nearly a half century ago, artists throughout the world have adapted their latest technologies to art-making. In this book, curator Barbara London, founder of MoMA's video program, traces the history of video art as it transformed into the broader field of media art - from analog to digital, small TV monitors to wall-scale projections, and clunky hardware to user-friendly software. By looking at the medium's first 50 years she reveals how video evolved from fringe status to be seen as one of the foremost art forms of today.⁠ Buy...

They say history is written by winners, dusty and dry, while saying little or nothing about the everyday lives and futures of those who were affected by the events. "Das Jahr 1990 freilegen" published by one of our most beloved publishers, spector books, proves in grand manner how to do it differently. After the editor Jan Wenzel spent one year looking for any photo, video, interview, protocol, diary, letter, he could possibly find, dated back to 1990, he came to the conclusion: Why writing another book, when everything is already there? Given the size of the book: there is a lot to 'there'! This chronic is an enormous valuable testimony of a year which is characterised by disorientation, confusion and over-abundance by the wealth of 1989. While the latter is known pretty well when David Hasselhoff came to Berlin, smashed his hit "Looking for Freedom" and the impossible became possible – at least that's what The Hoff thinks...

Eaten is a new sensational magazine about the history of food, created and edited by food historian Emelyn Rude. In this first volume themed “the food of the gods”, Eaten launches an exploration into how certain eating habits and recipes have emerged from the divine. Featuring stories about the revival of a nearly lost tradition of beer-brewing by the Benedictine monks of St. Wandrille Abbey, some directions on how to make an ancient Roman honey cake, the rite of butter carving in Tibet, and, a selection of poems by Rumi on the beauty of fasting in Ramadan. Buy...

The 11th issue of Gourmand features 1920s model and photographer Lee Miller, a dinner with Sonic Youth’s Lee Renaldo and his wife, a photo & text presentation by Jeremy Chan and Adrian Samson about the special African ingredients bringing flavour to Ikoy’s restaurant in London. Additionally – you’ve also got a photography of the exuberant earthenware of Raphael Bordallo Pinheiro, a reportage on the life of people in Chernobyl’s exclusion zone and a conversation with Indian chef Gaggan Anand who’s planning to close his restaurant in Bangkok even though it’s ranked 5th in the world top 50 restaurants! Buy...