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During the pandemic, Kara Walker made a series of drawings in the style of a medieval "Book of Hours". The disturbing images show the ways and extent of human suffering. They are reminiscent of Hieronymus Bosch's macabre and nightmarish depictions of hell, except that in this case it is not about the afterlife, but about our earthly lives. From scenes of biblical and mythological origin to images of historical violence and others suggestive of more recent political unrest, Walker's enigmatic images traverse time and place. Buy ...

Is this city being built up or torn down? Is it even the same city? The same streets? ⁠⁠ ⁠⁠ Transformation processes are the focus of Georg Aerni’s new photographs. The Swiss photographer and artist shows plastic greenhouses that have annexed whole swathes of land for agricultural mass production, residential houses that have been built overnight on the city outskirts without construction machines and literally noiselessly. He points his lens at olive trees that have grown over centuries into figures full of character, at creepers that conquer leftover spaces between high-rises and motorways, and at mighty rock faces that are being gnawed by erosion.⁠⁠ ⁠⁠ With the merging of art and documentation that is typical of Aerni’s work, Georg Aerni—Silent Transition makes the signs of change the object of a contemplative observation and at the same time asks challenging questions: about our handling of natural resources, about the social backgrounds to cities growing out of control, about the regenerative force of nature. ⁠⁠ Buy...

In architecture, the ground is usually used only as a passive foundation. This book explores the possibilities of buildings that merge with the ground, the earth and the landscape.⁠⁠ ⁠⁠ The evolution of architecture is also an evolution away from nature. The 1960s was the key moment when buildings were at their most clinical. Since then, more and more architects are trying to reconnect with nature. They work with the landscape and the special features of the site. But of course, this is not an invention of the modern age, it is what architecture has been for millennia. And so this book embarks on a journey around the world and through the history of architecture in search of examples of buildings and building methods that are not only in harmony with the landscape, but also make use of its special characteristics. In this way, these buildings are almost an extension of the earth's crust. ⁠⁠ ⁠⁠ One of the many fantastic examples are the churches of Lalibela in Ethiopia (seen in the first picture), which are not built upwards but downwards, literally carved out of the ground. You could call them a kind of negative architecture. ⁠⁠ ⁠⁠ Many of these historical examples were previously undocumented, so this book also serves as a kind of archive with first architectural drawings of these buildings, categorising them and making connections between methods and aesthetics.⁠⁠ ⁠⁠ Buy...

Plates like paintings, teapots in primitive style and sculptures with abstract forms and bold colours that defy any purpose or function - the ceramic works of Shun Kadohashi seem to combine prehistoric forms with abstract modernist painting. His works are the first to be featured in the Unearth book series, which explores the practice and processes of artists working with ceramics.⁠⁠ Buy...

In recent political debates, the concept of expert has undergone a shift in values from exaltation to disdain. In contexts as diverse as Brexit, climate change or vaccination, one encounters a palpable distrust of experts and an increasing tendency to throw their advice to the wind. Are we really witnessing the "death of the expert", or are the complaints about the "assault on science" just a hysterical reaction by elites who see their status threatened?⁠ Buy...

Do you remember Polly Pocket? As a child, you could carry your secret dream house around with you. A little plastic world in a case that looks like a powder compact. Personally, I was denied ownership of one of these kitschy dream houses, my parents didn't think much of plastic toys that make you dream of mainstream consumer objects. And yes maybe the aesthetic is questionable and yet it still has an appeal to me. It was the first time I dreamt of a house that wasn't my parents'. A symbol of independence. ⁠⁠ ⁠⁠ This is one of the points of investigation in the first issue of Reference, a magazine devoted to living design, from the said Polly Pocket to Stonehenge and Superstudio and many more unusual examples.⁠⁠ Buy...

Pier Paolo Pasolini, sadly long dead, remains inspiring and provocative not only because of his many talents as a linguist, man of letters, journalist and filmmaker, but also because of his themes. Pasolini never merely transfigured the archaism of remote regions or merely condemned progress, but in his appropriation of both poles he outlined a comprehensive poetics of experimental thought. In today's Europe of levelling and regulation, his voice is sorely missed. Buy...

In a world where addictive technology is designed to buy and sell our attention, and our value is determined by our 24/7 data productivity, it can seem impossible to escape. But in this inspiring field guide to dropping out of the attention economy, artist and critic Jenny Odell shows us how we can still win back our lives. Odell sees our attention as the most precious—and overdrawn—resource we have. And we must actively and continuously choose how we use it. We might not spend it on things that capitalism has deemed important … but once we can start paying a new kind of attention, she writes, we can undertake bolder forms of political action, reimagine humankind’s role in the environment, and arrive at more meaningful understandings of happiness and progress. Far from the simple anti-technology screed, or the back-to-nature meditation we read so often, How to do Nothing is an action plan for thinking outside of capitalist narratives of efficiency and techno-determinism. Provocative, timely, and utterly persuasive, this book will change how you see your place in our world.⁠ Buy...

Anders Frederik Steen, one of the central figures of natural winemaking, started out as a sommelier in Copenhagen - first at Noma, then opening Relæ and Manfreds - before heading to the South of France in 2013 to become a winemaker himself. These are his notes on winemaking and wine drinking, but they are also the doubts and insights during the learning process.⁠⁠ Poetry is Growing in our Garden shows what it means to understand (and misunderstand) wine, to taste and pair it, the balance between craftsmanship and abstract philosophy, and the technical details, in short, the thoughts of someone deep in their craft.⁠⁠   Buy...

AIKO is a visual and very personal diary by Berlin based photographer Florian Hetz. He turns his very own, unique gaze on the male body - its fears and obsessions, its shame and its lust. He successfully captures the breathing-sculpture quality of the portrayed men without turning them into objects of voyeuristic or even pornographic desire. The touching, intimate photographs tell a story about togetherness and loneliness.⁠⁠   Buy...