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If you are in anyway like us, having difficulties to keep even a basil alive on the windowsill, then this book comes just in time to create a small potted garden for this summer. Expert planting advice for growing fruit and vegetables in containers, whether it be a window box or a terracotta pot on a balcony, are accompanied by 50 delicious recipes. Aaron Bertelsen from the renowned English garden Great Dixter guides you through cultivation methods, the pots to be used, gives personal tips on choosing varieties and advice on cultivation and care. This book proves that lack of space is no obstacle to growing what you want to eat. And what could be better than harvesting and cooking home-grown food. Buy...

[gallery size="full" ids="86498,86499,82534"] "Written words are a funny thing. They surround us to an extent that it is almost impossible to escape them, and at the same time they tend to fly under the radar. They are omnipresent, in our streets, on our phones, sometimes even on our skin. We read words all day long and absorb their meaning, processing information, messages, ideas. We do so by looking at letters, but we hardly ever pay attention to their appearance, at least not consciously. And yet letters come in endless different forms, all of which carry meaning and evoke certain emotions and associations - often more so than the words themselves." And still typefaces are mere forms. They release their subliminal power only once their are used. So in a way they are more like a building material, absolutely crucial, but only becoming truly meaningful when people make language visible through them. ⁠That is why the newly released book by German Finnish masters of typography Schick Toikka shows not just their typefaces but interesting examples of how they have been put to use by others - hence the title "Other Words". Font descriptions, design studio introductions, as well as a wonderful preface written by Florian Hardwig, which we quoted above, turn this book into a reference book of a different kind. By featuring tons of type samples as well as works and collaborations with designers and artist that engage with Schick Toikka letterforms in visually and contextually interesting ways, the publication, created as a part of Schick Toikka's exhibition at Helsinki Design Museum, honers the ways in which fonts can be used.⁠⠀ Buy...

In Morocco, the only acceptable sexual activity is between a woman and her husband. Where all forms of extra-marital sex, homosexuality and prostitution are not only socially frowned upon but also punishable by law, women appear to have two options: be a virgin or be a wife.⁠ The first work of non-fiction in English from the prize-winning and internationally bestselling author Leila Slimani gives voice to young Moroccan women who are grappling with a conservative Arab culture that at once condemns and commodifies sex. By telling their intimate stories, by breaking taboos, by letting us into their thoughts and struggles, these women do not just break the silence, they also show that their lives and their lust matters. Which makes this book political and a vibrant appeal for the universal freedom to be, to love and to desire. ⁠ Buy...

“We live in sour times, and such sour times require sweet-and-sour methods. With the rise of social media, comedians as politicians, and populism, there has recently been vigorous debate over who constitutes ‘the people.’ For more than a couple millennia, satire has been a particularly contested genre to explore such questions, via varying degrees of serious invective or jocular teasing. Is each joke, as George Orwell maintained, a tiny revolution? Or does laughter and satire deflate the pressures and tension which could otherwise lead to political upheaval?”—Slavs and Tatars⁠ ⁠ Published on the occasion of the 33rd edition of the Ljubljana Biennial of Graphic Arts, CRACK UP – CRACK DOWN considers “the graphic” heritage of the Biennial not as a medium, per se, but rather as an agency and strategy. Purporting to speak truth to power, satire has proven itself to be a petri dish in a world of post-truth bacteria. Edited by Slavs and Tatars, the exhibition’s curators, CRACK UP – CRACK DOWN extends the discursive focus of the Biennial on graphics and satire.⁠ Buy...

Cambio is a small layer between the bark and the wood of a tree, which helps the tree to adapt to shifts within its biotope. But Cambio also means change in Italian. The visionary design practice Formafantasma created a critical exhibition of the same name for Serpentine Galleries, which deals with trees, forestry practices and wood production. Wood is such an old and renewable material that it is not the first we think of when we talk about the exploitation of the planet. We want to see it as a sustainable material without questioning whether our use of it is sustainable. We forget that trees are living beings we should seek a thoughtful coexistence with. The exhibition questions the role that the discipline of design can play in translating emerging environmental awareness into informed, collaborative responses.⁠ ⁠ Unfortunately, the exhibition is closed, as are so many places at the moment. But fortunately we have the accompanying book that will allow you to dive deep into the research and design process of Formafantasma. Essays and interviews by experts in the fields of science, conservation, technology, policy-making and philosophy are designed to give the reader different points of view, while a series of interviews with Formafantasma themselves, over the course of the research period, illustrate the enriching interplay that resulted from these conversations.⁠ ⁠ And if you want to see the whole video, you can find it on the Instagram account of Serpentine Galleries alongside Antenna Fantasma - a weekly series of discussions around ecology and design by Formafantasma.⁠ Buy...

Ronan Bouroullec is probably best known for his furniture design practice side on side with his brother - but he is also a painter. Ronan Bouroullec's works on paper follow the idea of so-called intuitive drawing. This technique enables him to develop new images and reach the subconscious layers of the mind. The latest publication "Juillet" shows a small selection of Ronan Bouroullec's latest drawings. But even if these are abstract, they give the impression of fabric, folds, upholstery or corrugated glass. The balance of form and colour within a few simple lines is astonishing and reassuring.⁠ Buy ⁠...

The postcards in this wonderful book will make you dream.⁠ Taken mainly from the 1960's - 1980's, they come from the good old times. The times when there was no Covid-19. The times when we could fly around the world without having a bad conscience because global warming was not a thing yet - well maybe it was but nobody listened. The times when we could fry ourselves dark brown in the sun, because skin cancer was unheard of - well, maybe not in the 80's anymore, but that is not the point. The point is that this beautiful collection of postcards, the ones where someone by hand painted the sky a little bluer, will make you feel nostalgic and light. Beach promenades, hotels, gardens and fountains, cityscapes by night and Alpine roads in a 70's colour scheme bring to you a worry-free, joyful holiday mood. Because this virus maybe can take our holidays but it cannot take our dreams...

While human activity is reduced to a minimum, earth is thriving. Looking at the images of the Venice channels being so clear that you can see every sand corn on the ground (who would have thought that the ground has beautiful light sand?!), one can not say anymore that the water is normally brown and muddy because Venice is build into a muddy lagoon. We know now it is not. We know now it is brown because we humans pollute it. And this is just one of many examples we are seeing in these days. ⁠So when you sit at home and wish that everything would go back to normal. Think again. If we go back to normal, we probably missed the lesson. Let us take this time to re-imagine what world we want to live in. And while we are convinced that the big steps for a more healthful coexistence of humans and nature should be regulated by far-reaching laws, there are many things everyone of us can incorporate into their daily life to do their part. How to start Nathalie Fee describes in her book How to Save the World for Free insistent, vivid, and lighthearted. Because if we don't, we might not be able to tell each other to "stay home" and "stay safe" soon anymore, since we destroyed our home and no one is safe.⁠ Buy...

Kenya is a country with a young, fashion-conscious population. However, as the local fashion labels are expensive and unaffordable for most people because the raw materials are imported, they have to resort either to mass-produced, low-quality and yet comparatively expensive garments from countries further east or to the Mitumba trade - imported second-hand clothes from the western world.⁠ Chaumont Zaerpour's "Things People Wear in Kenya" is a photographic study of fashion as it is lived, worn, produced and consumed there. The various fashion economies are interwoven in the book, which is primarily influenced by Kenyan voices - clothing designers and wearers alike, who talk about their perception of clothing.⁠ Moving between high fashion and everyday inventions, the duo records “the way people tinker, find ways to extract a new life out of used things, and the uniqueness of all these cobbled objects.”⁠ Buy...

Since the 16th century, all over the American continents, enslaved Africans have escaped their captors and founded their own communities or merged with indigenous peoples to form new identities. In his new series Cimarron - a Spanish-American term used to describe the fled slaves - Charles Fréger shows photographic portraits of their descendants today. In Brazil, Colombia, the Caribbean islands, Central America and the southern United States, masquerades are still staged today to celebrate and keep alive the history and cultural memory of African slaves and their descendants. Buy...