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Charlotte Perriand was one of the great designers of the twentieth century. But she has been pushed into the shadows of iconic male designers because, well, let's face it, she's a woman. The cover of this publication is one of the most poignant testaments to that. Charlotte Perriand designed the famous chaise longue LC4 with Le Corbusier, but instead of being known as the creator of this design classic, she was for a long time just an ornament. Passively placed on it for a photo.⁠ ⁠ However, this publication sets things straight and highlights the impact she has had on the field of design. But Perriand was even more than a furniture designer of timeless classics. For her, architecture and furniture had to be considered in union to create the modern interior. She called her holistic approach "the art of living". This extensive and beautifully illustrated book traces her long career from the 1920s to the end of the century. It captures a modernist pioneer and hugely influential designer but also reveals Perriand the person: dynamic, sporting, socially minded and collaborative.⁠   Buy...

Enjoy a hint of colour and fluidity thanks to the collection of drawings by renowned designer Ronan Bouroullec! Each publication of his drawings shows transformations in style and concentration of details while remaining all very unique Ronan Bouroullec.⁠ Ronan Bouroullec is probably best known for his furniture design practice alongside his brother - but he's also a painter. His works on paper follow the idea of so-called intuitive drawing. This technique allows him to develop new images and reach the subconscious layers of the mind. Even though these are abstract, they give the impression of fabrics, folds, upholstered furniture or wavy glass. The balance of form and color within a few simple lines is astonishing and reassuring.⁠   Buy...

The relationship between architecture and its representation is peculiar. On the one hand architecture is driven by a belief in the built, the material, the real. On the other hand, it is presented, explained, and discussed almost entirely through drawings, models, photographs and other forms of representation.⁠ ⁠ ⁠Archetypes features a recent series by Canadian artist David K. Ross, who works at the interface of photography, film, and installation. His images of architectural models, staged at night with dramatic lighting that isolates structures from their surroundings, puts the mockup on the main stage.⁠ ⁠ Published alongside Ross’s images are four essays framing the historical, technological, and civic significance of the mock-up.⁠   Buy...

Instead of declaring death a taboo, we should find ways to integrate it into our lives, as is already done in many cultures. Because even worse than grieving for a loved one is not knowing how to grieve and thus not having an outlet. And if one thing is certain in life, it is that it is finite.⁠ ⁠ Dramaturg Guy Cools shows us how important it is to be able to mourn the dead properly - from lament songs to mourning rituals. He is particularly interested in how the emotions of loss need to be externalised. Lamentations are a formal device used in many cultures to express the emotions of grief. In a poetic, meandering and personal way, Cools explores cultural customs, traditions, rituals and artistic performances.   Buy...

60 years ago, world leaders agreed to leave Antarctica free of war, weapons and nuclear waste. They declared that the uninhabited continent with no indigenous population, twice the size of Australia and 98% ice, should not belong to any country and instead be dedicated to community science. Additional rules to prevent companies from mining minerals and drilling for oil made Antarctica the largest protected area in the world. Now climate change is eroding that success story. ⁠ But higher temperatures aren't the only threat to the pristine natural environment; in recent years, the continent has become a contested territory, concealing resources that could prove irresistible in a world with an ever-growing population.⁠ ⁠ On the 200th anniversary of the discovery of Antarctica, Antarctic Resolution offers a high-resolution image of this hyper-surveilled yet neglected continent. In contrast to the fragmented view offered by Big Data companies, the book is a holistic study of the continent’s unique geography, unparalleled scientific potential, contemporary geopolitical significance, experimental governance system, and extreme inhabitation model. A transnational network of multidisciplinary polar experts – represented in the form of authored texts, photographic essays, and data-based visual portfolios – reveals the intricate web of growing economic and strategic interests, tensions, and international rivalries, which are normally enveloped in darkness, as is the continent for six months of the year.   Buy...

In the period leading up to the 2020 elections in the United States, Teju Cole began to photograph his kitchen counter in Massachusetts. He photographed it every day over the course of five weeks. ⁠The photographed microcosm is in constant change. However, its compactness and manageability has a calming effect in a time in which nothing seems calming and manageable.⁠⠀ ⁠⠀ Alongside the photographs is a long written essay, as wide-ranging in its concerns—hunger, fasting, mourning, slavery, intimacy, painting, poetry and the history of photography—as the photographs are delimited in theirs. ⁠⠀ ⁠   Buy...

Originally commissioned as a photo essay for the New Yorker in 1995, New York Living Rooms offers a frank and intimate study of the interior living spaces of some of the city’s most fabled cultural figures, including Susan Sontag, Norman Mailer, Louise Bourgeois, Francesco Clemente, Allen Ginsberg, and Joan Didion. With nothing added and nothing altered, photographer Dominique Nabokov calls these images her interior ‘portraits’. Some spaces are indulgent and ostentatious, others shelter the bare necessities, but Nabokov simply records them all for her fellow voyeurs.⁠ Long out of print, this updated edition brings back to life an era of New York City history, seen through Nabokov’s original Polaroid photos.⁠ ⁠ ⁠ New York Living Rooms is the first instalment in Dominique Nabokov’s holy trinity of interior photography works, re-issued by Apartamento Publishing more than two decades after it was first published in 1998. ⁠ ⁠   Buy...

“I fell in love with your father because of his beautiful legs.” Sara Perovic often heard this sentence as a child. When she went through the family photos, she noticed that her father was mainly photographed playing tennis. After all, that's what he spent most of his time and thoughts on. His obsession with the sport hindered his attention to her as a child, she reflected. And now the story could repeat itself with her daughter's father, who also has beautiful tennis legs.⁠⠀ ⁠⠀ ‘My Father’s Legs’, a little book of photos of her father's and partner's legs in tennis positions, detached from the rest of the body, is not only weirdly beautiful, but also visualises the search for a deeper connection and understanding.⁠⠀ ⁠   Buy...

Once the cutting-edge technology of their time - video, floppy disk, CD and Super8 film are now virtually useless. Often, we even still have collections of these media somewhere in the basement, but we have no way to play them anymore - they have become obsolete.⁠ But there are some enthusiasts and artists who still appreciate these audio and visual carriers - mainly because of their specific aesthetics, which take you back to their era like a time capsule. And yes, there is often nostalgia involved, or a certain cultural pessimistic reflex that claims that "everything was better in the old days," but the love of obsolete media is also rebellious in nature. When recorders and cable outlets are scarce, it takes a certain amount of stubbornness to keep the technology alive.⁠ ⁠ ⁠H.o.Me. - Home for Obsolete Media introduces different analog media in a technological and culture historical context and demonstrates the potential inherent in working analog in the digital age.⁠ ⁠   Buy...

Since the rise of social media, the heart symbol is everywhere. We click it to communicate that we "like" something, we use it at the end of a comment in place of a thank you, and to spread love across language barriers, especially in these times of conflict and increased attention to social and racial injustice. Afterall the harmless little heart is the universal symbol of love! But there's the problem: who claims love? The seemingly innocent heart symbol hides a much more complex story than its surface suggests.⁠ ⁠ With "hate groups" renaming themselves "organizations of love," heart symbols on AfD posters and other Alt-Right groups in Europe, it is becoming clear that the "love" in the heart symbol can just as easily be seen as "hate" by the opposing political view. And at the same time, we automatically project our own values onto the heart symbol. "Can't be meant badly, after all, it's in the name of love."⁠ With corporations putting heart symbols on their websites and plastic bags, and paying billions for targeted advertising based on our clicks on little heart-shaped buttons, it seems that love is being marketed, mass-produced and sold. The heart has become a button to click, an emoji to send, and a digital currency.⁠ It claims trust and good intentions without defining them.⁠ ⁠ This clever little book takes a hard look at the symbol of love from its origins to its uses to its meaning, and uncovers all the things that are done in the name of ❤️.⁠   Buy...