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Art

Drone Vision: Warfare, Surveillance, Protest brings the perfidious character of drones to the fore. Namely, seeing without being seen - and the associated insecurity and vulnerability, but also the usage for resistance and protest. The book presents three projects that move between art and politics - from migrant protests to colonial surveillance and the aesthetics of drone photography. The latter shows the geological scars and war remnants of five abandoned military sites in Israel - army strongholds, shooting ranges and urban warfare training facilities - and juxtaposes them with the personal and political scars engraved and marked on the private human body. Buy...

What is artistic research? What is a research document? How do these relate to the making process, invention, and creativity? ⁠ ⁠ Research For People Who (Think They) Would Rather Create addresses all relevant aspects that need to be considered during a research and documentation process, such as: finding the right topic and approach; formulating your research question; working out your methods; choosing one or more suitable writing styles; and considering the possible roles of visual, virtual, auditory, embodied, and spatial materials.⁠ Buy...

These fluffy animals are sure to be a cute companion for the coming year. The playful and quirky creatures were created using a wet-on-wet technique in which liquid watercolours run freely over a painting ground moistened with a sponge. The artist Rop van Mierlo has always been fascinated by modern man's urge to tame nature. On the contrary, he wanted to create wild animals that he could not control. The wet-on-wet technique seemed perfect for Rop's concept, as it allows for chance. And now these soft but uncontrollable creatures are coming to help you take control of the year ahead. Sounds like a winning team to us! Buy...

Every year we get a very special calendar. This time, it's from 83-year-old graphic design icon Karel Martens. "Everyday is a new day" has, you guessed it, a page for every day of the year. The 365 number compositions are designed in Martens' signature method of found and digitized metal pieces.⁠ ⁠ Buy...

Artist and fashion designer Cinzia Ruggeri (1942-2019) was definitely ahead with her nonconformist perspective and ever experimental practice. She investigated the architectural and social dimension of the body with irony and oneirism.⁠ ⁠ Cinzia Says… is the first monograph on this unconventional figure who moved across disciplines with absolute freedom.⁠ Buy...

The Dictionary of Color Combinations is probably one of the most beautiful books we ever held in our hands! After it has been sold out for a year, we finally have it back in stock and are mesmerized as before.⁠..⁠ ⁠ The pocket size jewel offers 348 incredible color combinations by Japanese painter Sanzo Wada. The compositions of two, three, and four tones could not be more intriguing and with its index registering the CMYK code of every shade used it is an indispensable tool for every designer.⁠ Buy...

The idea for Paradise Camp came to Yuki Kihara, an interdisciplinary artist of Japanese and Samoan descent, as she sat in front of three Gauguin paintings at the Met in New York. With a bit of luck, she was let into the museum before the official opening time, along with the security guards and cleaners. As she sat almost alone on an ottoman in front of these paintings in the museum, Kihara thought of Ngahuia Te Awekotuku's 1992 essay on Gauguin, in which Te Awekotuku asks whether Gauguin's famous paintings are "stories of mahu trickery" - mahu being the third gender in Tahiti.⁠⁠ ⁠⁠ Paul Gauguin's paintings of Tahitian women have often been criticised for their over-sexualised depictions. But Yuki Kihara, a fa'afafine - the third gender of Samoa - also saw a Western vision of exoticism and gender norms imposed on Pacific Islanders that was never her own. And so she decided to reclaim paradise.⁠⁠ Yuki Kihara is known for exploring the complexities of postcolonial history in the Pacific and challenging Western misinterpretations from the Fa'afafine perspective. Paradise Camp uses striking visual language to explore small island ecologies, queer rights, intersectionality and decolonisation, drawing attention to often untold, marginalised histories and issues facing Kihara's community.⁠⁠ ⁠⁠ ⁠⁠Paradise Camp is on show in the New Zealand Pavilion at this year's Venice Biennale.⁠⁠ Buy...

This book brings together frank and sincere conversations about art and music from the first five years of the ongoing radio show Rough Version on the iconic online station NTS Radio.⁠ ⁠ Conceived and hosted by author and curator Francesca Gavin, the monthly show has captured the musical output and sonic inspirations of some of the biggest and most interesting emerging names in contemporary art. The music opens the door to each international artist's practice, providing insights into who they are, what motivates them and what they like to listen to.⁠ Buy...

[vc_row][vc_column width='1/5'][/vc_column][vc_column width='3/5'] In a time when everything looks so flawless and shiny on our backlit screens, an imperfect, experimental and raw aesthetic is on the rise again as a counterculture. Zines have retained this character since the 60s until today. The thin booklets in simple photocopy style are the original form of self-publishing - fast, selfmade and niche. Usually monothematic and with small print runs, they print the part of culture that is absent from mainstream publications. Because profit is not the goal, but representation and participation in shaping culture. Their simple, analogue charm leaves room for experimentation with visual language. And so they are and always have been an uncut a constant source of inspiration. No wonder, then, that they are making a comeback! More

Nicolas Floc'h's photographs seem to come from another world. Unearthly rock formations and scattered tiny star-like dots in infinite darkness. But these images are not from outer space. Rather, they have been taken from the surface of our planet Earth, and yet they are completely inaccessible to humans.⁠ ⁠ These alien-looking landscapes are from the bottom of the ocean, so deep that there is no light and no human can get there. To take the pictures, Nicolas Floc'h strapped his self-developed wide-angle camera system to the front of the Ariane robot and used the Ariane's headlights to illuminate the landscapes. Eleven dives between -700 and -1800 metres explore the ocean and our planet at the edge of the visible.⁠ Buy...