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Art

Nicolas Floc'h's photographs seem to come from another world. Unearthly rock formations and scattered tiny star-like dots in infinite darkness. But these images are not from outer space. Rather, they have been taken from the surface of our planet Earth, and yet they are completely inaccessible to humans.⁠ ⁠ These alien-looking landscapes are from the bottom of the ocean, so deep that there is no light and no human can get there. To take the pictures, Nicolas Floc'h strapped his self-developed wide-angle camera system to the front of the Ariane robot and used the Ariane's headlights to illuminate the landscapes. Eleven dives between -700 and -1800 metres explore the ocean and our planet at the edge of the visible.⁠ Buy...

Media artist Hito Steyerl illuminates the power structures, inequalities and obscurities of the world. From surveillance, alienated labour, militarisation, protest culture, corporate domination and the art market, she exposes the systemic structures behind them. If one were to give her a title, it would probably be that of a network thinker. No wonder her texts and essays are as groundbreaking as her artistic works.⁠ ⁠ This interdisciplinary anthology analyses how Steyerl's work and writing influence and cross-fertilise each other.⁠ Buy...

Berlin, our home and favourite city. Populated by strong characters, pigeons, open-minded hedonists, grumpy misfits, dogpiles, nightshade plants dressed in black, opinionated daydreamers - and simply the best people in the world. And who better to portray all these than Stefan Marx, scribbling all their uniqueness and characteristics in his notebook. On the train, in the park, at the Späti, in the supermarket, at the airport. Buy...

Matter is a constant. It has been there from the beginning and it will remain in the future. ⁠ Derived from the Latin word mater, meaning mother, it refers to the substance of which all things are made. In English, the word can also refer to urgency or importance, something to be taken care of. Aleix Plademunt's photographic project Matter explores matter, which although itself inert, immobile and unable to reproduce, is the basis of all life. This book is about our origins, existence and the Big Bang. And about the organism at the end of which is death - but matter remains.⁠ Buy...

For the 59th Biennale, Maria Eichhorn had the extraordinary idea of moving the entire German Pavilion to another location for the duration of the Biennale and then reassembling it at its original site after the Biennale. When she examined the structure of the pavilion for this undertaking, she discovered that it was not ONE building at all, but in fact, made up of two: the Bavarian Pavilion, built in 1909, and the extensions made by the Nazis in 1938, as can be seen today. While the Bavarian Pavilion was built on a human scale, the 1938 alterations to the main room and the adjoining room look intimidating and make the visitor feel small. Massive pillars replace the previous slender Ionic columns, and an additional 4 metres in height elevate the rooms to an oppressive size with a sacral atmosphere. Are these really spaces in which an open and critical reception of art is possible?⁠ By excavating the foundations of the pavilion and removing layers of plaster from the walls to expose the connections between the previous structure and the remodelled building, Eichhorn exposes not only the history but also the ideologies manifested in architecture. ⁠ ⁠ In addition to a vast photographic documentation of the project and numerous historical photographs, the publication brings together essays and studies on the history of the Biennale and the German Pavilion, as well as on broader aspects embracing art history, philosophy, urban sociology, and politics. Buy...

Famous as a designer and founding member of the Memphis Group, Nathalie Du Pasquier’s main medium became painting, and that since 35 years. For Nathalie Du Pasquier, the boundaries between design and art are fluid. Easily navigating between pattern, textile, ceramics, and painting, she allows shapes, spaces and forms to interrelate. Her use of colour is unparalleled. ⁠ ⁠ This book, accompanying Pasquier's exhibition at MACRO in Rome, moves between exhibition catalogue and artist's book. Photographs of Nathalie Du Pasquier's works, installation views of the exhibition are juxtaposed with excerpts from texts by various authors and personalities that are fundamental to Pasquier's practice. The pages of this wonderfull publication become exhibition spaces themselves, allowing associations and combinations. They enable a deeper understanding and engagement with Nathalie Du Pasquier's work and her imagination.⁠ So instead of merely being an exhibition catalogue, this publication can be seen as an extension of the exhibition itself.⁠ Buy...

[vc_row][vc_column width='1/5'][/vc_column][vc_column width='3/5'] Here at do you read me?!, we are blessed with all sorts of interesting customers. Tourists from all over the world in search of unusual publications (and lots of tote bags); awkward couples on obvious first dates searching our shelves for books as well as a basic thread of conversation; the occasional gigantic dog roaming in with its owner and promptly sprawling over a sizable section of our little shop. But in the end, nothing tops the simple pleasure of seeing a customer derive visible, almost tactile joy, when they finally hold the latest issue of their favourite magazine in their hands. This month’s installment of our Surprise Subscription is a prime example of this particular phenomenon. We are excited to share with you… Real Review!  

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During the pandemic, Kara Walker made a series of drawings in the style of a medieval "Book of Hours". The disturbing images show the ways and extent of human suffering. They are reminiscent of Hieronymus Bosch's macabre and nightmarish depictions of hell, except that in this case it is not about the afterlife, but about our earthly lives. From scenes of biblical and mythological origin to images of historical violence and others suggestive of more recent political unrest, Walker's enigmatic images traverse time and place. Buy ...

For an Exhibition at Aloft at Hermès in Singapore, French artist Xavier Antin created a machine that validates Bitcoin transaction. A fraction of the processed transaction rewards this "work". The cryptocurrency accumulated through the machine is then used to finance automatic delivery of bouquets of flowers to the Aloft Space. This book shows these bouquets, which are beautifully Riso-printed using only orange, green, medium blue, flat gold, yellow and purple. Below each image is a reference to the validated transaction used to pay for the flowers.⁠⁠   Buy...

Xavier Corberó (1935–2017) is among the foremost Spanish artists of the last century. His sculptures in rough-hewn stone, marble, and bronze gave form to ideas running through a circle of contemporary surrealist artists. His works are widely and internationally celebrated in institutions like London’s V&A and New York’s The Met. But maybe his greatest artwork is located on the outskirts of Barcelona in the form of the home he built for himself! ⁠⁠ ⁠⁠ Over a period of five decades, he created a series of labyrinthine rooms, levels, buildings and vaults, expanding them whenever he had money and re-planning them during morning walks with the local builder. The House of Xavier Corberó, edited by his daughter Ana Corberó, is the first publication to explore this house in Esplugues de Llobregat. It includes original photographs by Daniel Riera and a series of texts by long-time friends and colleagues of the artist: architects Ricardo Bofill and Josep Acebillo, World Architecture Festival programme director Paul Finch, artist and journalist Celia Lyttelton, RBTA director Pablo Bofill, and an interview by filmmaker Albert Moya with Corberó himself.⁠⁠ ⁠   Buy...