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Architecture

Eileen Gray is today one of the most celebrated designers and architects. But that was not always the case. Throughout her career, she struggled for acceptance as a woman in male-dominated professions. In Paris, she opened a gallery under the name Jean Désert that sold furniture and rugs. The gallery also served as an exhibition space for modern art, making Gray, albeit working under a male pseudonym, one of the first women gallerists.⁠ ⁠ She is best known, however, for her furniture, lighting, rugs, architecture, and especially for her signature Japanese lacquer technique, which she learned from Seizo Sugawara. ⁠ ⁠ Accompanying the exhibition at the Bard Graduate Center Gallery, organized by the Centre Pompidou, this richly illustrated catalog focuses on the diversity of Gray's design practices and explores the range of her architectural projects. It is divided into three sections: "Beginnings", which focuses on Gray's early life and education; "Being a Designer", which explores her career as a designer of furniture, rugs, and interiors; and "Being an Architect", which answers the prevailing question of whether Eileen Gray was an architect with a resounding yes.⁠ Buy...

When Heidi Weber first met Le Corbusier, she bought one of his artworks. But the encounter was not only to become a long-lasting friendship, but also a project that would bring the so-called "prodigal son of Swiss architecture", who had been lured away from his homeland by the prospect of bigger and bolder projects, back to Switzerland to create what would become his final work.⁠ ⁠ Weber convinced Le Corbusier to construct the planned pavilion entirely out of glass and steel, materials for which it would become iconic. Designed according to the architect's famous Modulor system, a scale of proportions designed to balance the dimensions of the human body with beauty and architecture, the building is topped by a floating steel roof that creates a seductive contrast between solidity and weightlessness. The pavilion was completed 1967 - two years after Le Corbusier's death.⁠ ⁠ The second exhibition at the now refurbished Pavillon Le Corbusier highlights the relationship between the Swiss architect of the century and the city of Zurich. It puts Zurich back into the light as an important point of reference for his work. With works of art, furniture, architectural models, photographs and historical documents, the exhibition shows the central role that Zurich - and not only Paris - played in Le Corbusier’s multifaceted oeuvre.⁠ Buy...

Many cities in Europe are once again restricting social life, but this time it feels different. The first lockdown in spring had a collective feeling. We were separated, but we were closer together in heart than on any other "normal" day. We were supportive and said that we would get through this together. That spirit is not there this time. The excitement about the novelty of this situation has disappeared, and so somehow the limitations feel more exhausting. Probably because we have to deal with them alone this time. ⁠ So while our cities are operating in low-power mode, it may be the right time to record what we are really missing. What is it that makes a city? Living the City - Of Cities, People, and Stories is an architecture book that focuses on the non-physical elements that make up our cities. After a first look at urbanites it expands into emotionally and poetically charged stories that consider very basic activities such as loving, living, moving, working, learning, playing, dreaming, and participating. This publication focuses on the human side of cities, on what happens after houses are built, traffic is strategically controlled and parks are created.⁠   Buy...

When you think of Naples' architecture, you might think of the crumbling but lively Spanish quarters, the classic buildings of the historic centre or the grand villas of Posillipo, but rarely do you think of modernism. But there are modernist buildings all over the city, in a very particular style that combines modernism with Mediterranean culture and local materials. Napoli - Super Modern, an atlas of eighteen significant buildings from 1930-1960, illustrated with site and floor plans, views, sections and photographs by celebrated photographer Cyrille Weiner, shows another side of this vibrant metropolis under Mount Vesuvius.⁠   Buy...

Do you know the work of Forensic Architecture? If not, then be prepared to get your mind blown! Connecting real cases of human rights and environmental violations with the tools used in architecture and design, this studio creates a Wolpertinger of art and real evidence which is then used in some of the biggest court cases and tribunals of recent years. ⁠ ⁠ From makeshift satellites constructed with a simple kite, a plastic bottle, some rubber band and a camera, documenting evidence of Bedouin inhabitation in the Negev desert where Bedouin ownership is contested; to reading the "fingerprints" of smoke clouds left behind by missile strikes; to training AI to identify teargas canisters in Hong Kong; to rebuilding whole rooms in 3D to verify the testimony of witnesses - Forensic Architecture is often challenged by voices declaring in an exhibition "This is evidence, not art!" or in a trial "This is art, not evidence!". Truth is, that exhibiting their work in art exhibitions draws international attention to cases that States or big corporations would only too gladly keep unnoticed. It helps victims be heard and get access to a public stage. It also sheds light on injustices, corruption and failures of our political systems. Which is the basis for change. But the fragments of truth are so meticulously and creatively collected, investigated and displayed that they all too often are also the missing proof in a trial. So what is it now? Art or Evidence? One of our all-time-favorite magazines mono.kultur set out to shed light on the manyfold works through an in depth interview with founder Eyal Weizman. And while you should absolutely read this heart stopping issue of mono.kultur we can already say that Forensic Architecture is the answer to the question what happens when art has real-world consequences.⁠   Buy...

A special issue of A Magazine Curated By opens the doors to Floragatan 13 - the head office of Acne Studios in Stockholm. The ex-Czechoslovakian embassy evokes with its brutalist elements and concrete features the former Eastern Bloc, but once you enter ⁠stone carved furniture by Max Lamb already give you a hint that things are different here. Rooms in dusty pink, chairs in yellow leather, hangers full of samples, fabrics stuffed until the ceiling - the Acne Headquarters are designed to show the Acne-cool but also to bring to mind the experimental and ever changing structures of a fashion school. Because nothing kills innovation more than routine.⁠   Buy...

In need of any ideas while staying at home this winter? Why not read this exceptional – and loooong – interview about five friends who used their spring lock-down time rather wisely for the last refinements of their magazine. The very first issue of Superposition is about nothing else than the 'Hardcore Home'. This wild hodgepodge of absurd and compelling home narratives with an architectural touch – and a beautiful layout - will take you into the hidden, obscure notions of your beloved Home sweet Home!
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Das Einfamilienhaus - Eine Wohnform in der Sackgasse.⁠ Das Buch hinter diesem wunderbaren Titel schaut genauer auf das größte Glück des deutschen Mittelstandes. Denn obwohl das Einfamilienhaus ein soziologisch hochinteressantes Thema ist, gibt es kaum Literatur zum architektonischen Bastard, dessen Vater das proletarische Siedlungshaus und Mutter die bürgerliche Villa ist, wie Benedikt Loderer scharf analysierte. Buy...

It’s here! PIN-Up's issue 28 is inspired by the star that makes life possible on this planet - the sun.⁠ This issue brings you Studio Mumbai forever inspired by the romance of air, water, and light; luminary architect Francis Kéré as down-to-earth as ever; Gulf Futurism artist Sophia Al-Maria; architecture historian Beatriz Colomina discusses sunlight, architecture, and illness; a sunbook special with reflections on melting Modernism, tanning beds, heart-shaped resorts, nudist utopias, architectural sunsets, and a forecast of tomorrow’s sunglasses; an obsessive sunflower portfolio; Nerea Calvillo on pollen, particles, and pollution; an ode to shadows featuring this season’s finest sofas, and architect Christian Wassmann’s manifesto of the sun.⁠ Buy...

When Swiss-Dutch landscape architect Anouk Vogel got invited to take part of the Architecture Monogram series she decided to do this – yet, not without her alter ego. Vogel is used to hear both sides of the story, when she starts to think about new projects – sometimes solely within her head, sometimes as soft whisper, while one adopts the analytical tasks, the other one stays intuitive. How this on-going dialogue ‘sounds’ like can be seen and ‘listened to’ in this thoughtfully composed artist book. Thereby her inner Q&A never stands alone. Architectural designs, photographs, and material collections accompany her thoughts and probably represents best, what both sides of her brain hemispheres certainly can agree on: “I wish design could be simply the possibility of something.” - “Rather than an end product?” - “Yes”. Buy...